Petrol Prices Down, House Prices, Down, Down, By Peter Bennett

     Great news! Petrol prices are way down, dirt cheap, 50 cents a litre in some places, due to geo-politics and the coronavirus, which is an unexpected positive. Now to go on a long road trip. Wait, we are imprisoned in our homes under self-arrest. So, it is all for nothing. At least I can fill up the tank of the old Holden, one, and hope that no roaming gangs milk my tank. No, petrol is too cheap. 
  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8175715/Sydney-service-station-lowers-petrol-price-50-CENTS-litre.html?ito=push-notification&ci=12026&si=1326534

     And speaking of homes, house prices are a-crashing.
  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8174539/Australian-house-prices-tipped-plunge-40-cent-coronavirus-hits-economy.html?ito=push-notification&ci=12014&si=1326534

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How Spanish and Italian Communism and Socialism, Kills By Richard Miller

     Communist ideology, in both Spain and Italy has been a catalyst for the present coronavirus crisis in these countries:
  https://www.zerohedge.com/political/how-progressive-ideology-led-covid-19-catastrophe-spain

“The Spanish government, comprised of a coalition of Socialists and Communists, is facing legal action for alleged negligence in its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The government is accused of putting its narrow ideological interests ahead of the safety and wellbeing of the public, and, in so doing, unnecessarily worsening the humanitarian crisis now gripping Spain, currently the second-worst afflicted country in Europe after Italy.
A class action lawsuit filed on March 19 accuses the Spanish government — highly ideological by any standard, as the Communist coalition partner, Podemos, was founded with seed money from the Venezuelan government — of knowingly endangering public safety by encouraging the public to participate in more than 75 feminist marches, held across Spain on March 8, to mark International Women's Day. The nationwide rallies were aimed at protesting the government's perennial bugbear: the alleged patriarchy of Western civilization. Hundreds of thousands of people participated in those marches, and several high-profile attendees — including Spain's deputy prime minister, as well as the prime minister's wife and mother, and also the wife of the leader of Podemos — have since tested positive for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is unknown how many people were infected by the coronavirus as a result of the rallies. The lawsuit, involving more than 5,000 plaintiffs, accuses Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez and his representatives in Spain's 17 autonomous regions of "prevarication" — a Spanish legal term that means lying and deceiving. The government was allegedly so determined to ensure that the feminist marches took place on March 8 that it deliberately downplayed warnings about the pandemic.”

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Chinese Coronavirus a Disease of Civilisation By Chris Knight

     The coronavirus is a disease of globalisation, argues Yale University historian of pandemics, Frank Snowdon in an interview published in the Wall Street Journal, something which we here fully endorse, and have been in fact saying for some time. Globalisation, globalises disease, leading to civilizational breakdown:
  https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/03/29/coronavirus-globalization-historian/
  http://archive.is/WJn3p

“The coronavirus is threatening “the economic and political sinews of globalization, and causing them to unravel to a certain degree,” Mr. Snowden says. He notes that “coronavirus is emphatically a disease of globalization.” The virus is striking hardest in cities that are “densely populated and linked by rapid air travel, by movements of tourists, of refugees, all kinds of businesspeople, all kinds of interlocking networks.” Respiratory viruses, Mr. Snowden says, tend to be socially indiscriminate in whom they infect. Yet because of its origins in the vectors of globalization, the coronavirus appears to have affected the elite in a high-profile way. From Tom Hanks to Boris Johnson, people who travel frequently or are in touch with travelers have been among the first to get infected. That has shaped the political response in the U.S., as the Democratic Party, centered in globalized cities, demands an intensive response. Liberal professionals may also be more likely to be able to work while isolated at home. Republican voters are less likely to live in dense areas with high numbers of infections and so far appear less receptive to dramatic countermeasures. … Coronavirus is far less lethal, but it does shatter assumptions about the resilience of the modern world. Mr. Snowden says that after World War II “there was real confidence that all infectious disease were going to be a thing of the past.” Chronic and hereditary diseases would remain, but “the infections, the contagions, the pandemics, would no longer exist because of science.” Since the 1990s—in particular the avian flu outbreak of 1997—experts have understood that “there are going to be many more epidemic diseases,” especially respiratory infections that jump from animals to humans. Nonetheless, the novel coronavirus caught the West flat-footed. It’s too early to say what political and economic imprint this pandemic will leave in its wake. As Mr. Snowden says, “there’s much more that isn’t known than is known.” Yet with a mix of intuition and luck, Renaissance Europeans often kept at bay a gruesome plague whose provenance and mechanisms they didn’t understand. Today science is capable of much more. But modernity has also left our societies vulnerable in ways 14th-century Venetians could never have imagined.”

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Birmingham and the Great Replacement By Charles Taylor (Florida)

     American Renaissance has begun a series of articles about the Great Replacement of whites by everyone else in the West, by authors Gregory hood, Henry Wolff and Paul Kersey, who are vets in this most terrible field of research. Here is some material on Birmingham, and I dread reading the next depressing piece:
  https://www.amren.com/blog/2020/03/birmingham-after-desegregation/

“People used to call Birmingham, Alabama the “Magic City.” Today, it’s the Tragic City. Massive steel plants sprang up after the Civil War, and Birmingham grew rapidly in the first half of the 1900s. In the 1960s, however, it became a key battleground in the Civil Rights movement, with Martin Luther King leading desegregation efforts. Civil rights campaigners got what they wanted: Birmingham desegregated. Today, it’s a majority-black city with poverty, bad schools, and high crime. Although we usually associate industry with the North, Birmingham used to be the largest iron- and steel-producing area in the country. Many workers in the furnaces were black, but the city was segregated: Blacks and whites lived in different neighborhoods. King and other civil rights organizers launched a campaign against segregation in 1963 that was a huge public-relations success. “But for Birmingham,” said President John Kennedy at a White House meeting to plan what became Civil Rights Act of 1964, “we wouldn’t be here.” Today, American schoolchildren learn about Birmingham, Eugene “Bull” Connor, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s campaign in 1963. They don’t learn what happened afterwards. Between 1960 and 2000, the city’s population dropped by 38 percent; the decline has just started to level off. In 1971, a federal judge ordered integration for Jefferson county’s schools. Many whites seceded from the county and established their own school districts. They are now some of the best in the country. In contrast, just one in five students in Birmingham City Schools are proficient in reading or math. Most qualify for free or cut-price lunches. Fewer than 2 percent are white.

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The New Public Gathering Rule By James Reed

     Here is an interesting article giving us a vision of the future, about three weeks’ time:
  https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-27/fled-new-york-for-sydney-my-coronavirus-warning/12092882

“I have a grim message for you from the future. About three weeks into the future, to be precise. My wife, our two daughters and I stepped off the plane in Los Angeles earlier this week as if emerging from a dream — or was it entering one? The reality we walked into seemed nothing like the one we had left in New York a few hours earlier. In our home neighbourhood in Brooklyn, friends had become strangers, and strangers had become threats. Our usual Sesame Street existence — in which a life of shared outdoor space turned every walk along the brownstones into a string of impromptu conversations with neighbours, crossing guards and shopkeepers — had descended into a lonely and menacing dash for essential supplies. People would cross the street as they saw you approaching. Regulars at our local cafe, when it was still open, would shout at others in line to keep their distance; parents in the park would usher their kids away from you with surgical-gloved hands. Everyone was a threat. Anyone could kill. After a string of cancellations and last minute re-bookings, we finally made it onto one of the last flights out — a hasty emigration brought forward by circumstance, all of our belongings left behind indefinitely. The plane was empty. When an airport worker at LAX started yelling at us to bunch closer together, two by two instead of single-file, I realised the coronavirus did not seem to represent the threat it did in Brooklyn. Fifteen hours later, as we disembarked in Sydney, it did not seem to exist at all. It's too late for New York, but not for Sydney. Like the background noise of an airplane safety demonstration, we were given vague instructions by quarantine officers to self-isolate for two weeks, handed a Department of Health fact sheet, then released into the wild. We stepped outside to be transported back in time, to New York three weeks ago. Schools and businesses were still open, beaches were packed (later that day Bondi closed and further shutdowns were announced), and people mingled — perhaps in denial of the new reality headed their way.”

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Mike Adam’s Letter to the Normies Who Let it all Happen By Chris Knight

     We all know them: people who we have spoken to about the political issues, but who worship money and comfort, and do nothing out of apathy and self-interest. My eldest son for example, now has a girl friend from an establishment rich family of lawyers, and will have nothing to do with me, because I am critical of the system. However, this family got a body blow from the coronapocalpyse, when their clients were reduced by 50 percent in just the first few weeks. I don’t wish anyone ill, but in the end, people harvest what they reap, or as the Bible says, sow the wind, reap a whirlwind (Hosea 8:7).
  https://www.naturalnews.com/2020-03-28-dear-america-you-are-now-living-under-the-tyranny-you-deserve.html

“Dear clueless America,
You are now living under the tyranny you deserve. For the last four years, as truth-telling websites like Natural News were smeared, de-platformed and silenced, you said nothing. You were more interested in your Starbucks lattes, your inflated stock market shares, and virtue signaling your obedience to pop culture than defending the right of people to tell the truth. You let the world’s “facts” be determined by the most evil, communist-infiltrated techno-fascists imaginable: Google, Wikipedia, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and many more. You said nothing as they silenced independent publishers who told the truth about natural cures, herbal remedies and the dangers of biological weapons research (which we desperately warned the world about in 2012). As long as YOU weren’t banned, that was the most important priority in your mind, and you rapidly self-censored your own speech to make sure you could continue to earn ad revenue on YouTube by complying with their “community guidelines” that outlawed truth and reason. The reason you are stuck in an apartment in a high-density city, beating your head against the wall while your stock market portfolio vanishes with each passing day is because you thought it was more important to be obedient than free. You went along with the hyperventilating, screaming masses as they demanded the de-platforming of Natural News, InfoWars and an endless list of independent media organizations, claiming your “fact checkers” had a divine monopoly on facts (even though they were mostly funded by interested linked back to Big Pharma).

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Cappy Capitalism’s Letter to the World’s Journalists By Chris Knight

     Libertarian economist “Captain Capitalism,” who is unafraid of attacking the system, has penned this open letter to the world’s journalists:

“Dear Journalists and Journalism Majors,
In light of the recent layoffs in your "profession" I think you need to know where your place in this world is, especially given the state of journalism these past few decades.

You are completely unnecessary.
You are not "critical" to the economy, let alone society.
The vast majority of you are lazy adult children who didn't want to try hard in college, but had the added flaw of being arrogant enough at 17 years of age to think you knew better AND other people should listen to you.
You are propagandists.
Liars.
Political pawns.
Yellow journalists.
Brown journalists.
The scum of the Earth.

The average citizen with the freedom of speech and an internet connect is a drastically superior journalist, as well as human being to you.

Please FOAD.  You offer nothing of value to society.  You are worthless human beings.

Sincerely,
People with Real Jobs Who Work for a Living

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How Will a Consumer Soft Generation Survive Hardship? By John Steele

     Bernard Salt is someone that James Reed has been criticising for years, on the immigration issue, Salt being a big Australia kind of bloke. But, apart from that he does some thoughtful pieces like this one which talks about something few in the MSM ever get to: the softness of the present generation comparted to those who struggled through the Great Depression.
  https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/how-the-coronavirus-might-change-australia/news-story/c3a0889ed3df4dbf80fbb69f0b7226b4?

“We modern Australians are not a hardy people, and have not been collectively subjected to truly harsh times such as war or depression. In some ways it is harder for us to manage adversity because we are the product of prosperity. But manage adversity we must, and we will. Let us now ensure that we learn the lessons and work to create a stronger, safer and more resilient Australia.”

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Don’t Stand So Close to Me! By Peter Bennett

     Back in 1980, when rock singer Sing was with the band, The Police, and he had a bit more hair, they released the song, Don’t Stand So Close to Me. It was terrible then, dealing with some sort of decadence, but today the song is strangely relevant, especially in Singapore, a highly regulated society, which mirrors how the rest of the West will inevitably go total authoritarian after this crisis in the next wave of the New World Order:
  https://www.zerohedge.com/health/singapore-jail-people-6-months-standing-too-close-strangers

“Singapore is set to punish people who stand too close to strangers with 6 months in prison as the true scope of “social distancing” measures begins to be felt around the world. According to a press release from the country’s Ministry of Health, Singaporeans who fail to maintain a distance of one meter from other people during “non-transient” public interactions can be fined 10,000 Singapore dollars ($6,985) or hit with 6 months in jail. The measure is obviously designed to target groups of people who congregate or people who visit their friends and relatives. As the resentment of being forced to live under quarantine lockdown for weeks and possibly months builds, authorities across the world are undoubtedly going to face a growing backlash from the citizenry, no matter how bad the spread of coronavirus. In France, a 35-year-old man was sent to prison after repeatedly violating lockdown measures after being found guilty of “endangering the lives of others.” Another 19-year-old man was handed a 4 month suspended prison sentence for repeatedly flouting the measures 10 times in just a few days. In Jordan, authorities initially banned everyone from going outside, even to buy food, leading to the arrest of 800 people. More than 90,000 Italians have also been hit with fines for violating quarantine while transgressors in Spain can face up to 18 months in prison. As we highlighted yesterday, one police force in the UK is using drone surveillance technology to spy on people who walk their dogs in remote areas and then track down their home address. Meanwhile, in “troubled” areas of European cities such as Seine-Saint-Denis in Paris, migrants are virtually immune from quarantine measures because large groups of them intimidate police if they try to enforce them.”

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Should the Media be Shut Down Too? By James Reed

     It is not all bad; I am delighted by what this present bug crisis has done to the evil universities, who still exist, but are largely on-line, where they have minimal mischief, largely chattering amongst themselves. Why, academics were so scared for their lungs, that students could not believe how fast they ran to their homes to lock down with their bottles of fine wine. Anyway, let’s move on to closing down the mainstream media now for even more peace.
  https://gellerreport.com/2020/03/why-isnt-the-media-forced-to-shut-down-stay-home-the-way-we-are.html/
  https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2020/03/why-media-exempt-coronavirus-business-shutdowns-daniel-greenfield/#.Xn5e_Xtd-VU.twitter

“"You're actually sitting too close," President Trump remarked at a press briefing. "Really, we should probably get rid of about 75, 80 percent of you.” Trump was only partly joking. The White House Correspondents Association had asked its members to sit one seat apart at press briefings, but at a time when most businesses have been shut down even when they offer far more space to customers and employees, the sight of crowded press briefings is still surreally hypocritical. Governor Jared Polis delivered his press briefing on social distancing surrounded by a huddle of other Colorado officials, including a sign language translator, and tightly packed reporters facing him. That’s not unusual. Governors and mayors have announced the shutdown of countless businesses for the sake of social distancing in the same format that is the opposite of social distancing. The exemption for the media from coronavirus rules extends beyond these strange scenes. When Governor Andrew Cuomo issued an order effectively shutting down most New York non-essential businesses, the list of essential organizations exempted from the order included hospitals, power plants, pharmacies, farms, banks, supermarkets, and the media. One of these items is not like the others. The essential businesses provide necessary services that allow people to function.

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Sweden says no to quarantine – is this the most reckless or the most proportionate Covid-19 response in the West?

     By Guy Birchall, British journalist covering current affairs, politics and free speech issues. Recently published in The Sun and Spiked Online. With most of Europe imposing extraordinary restrictions to slow the spread of coronavirus, Sweden has left its citizens surprisingly free. Are Swedes rolling the dice with their public health, or is everyone else overreacting? As most of Europe clamps down in a bid to slow the spread of Covid-19, one country is bucking the trend. Sweden is taking a markedly more liberal approach to combatting the virus. Despite its closest neighbours, Denmark and Norway, shutting down all but essential services, Swedes remain free to socialise as the harsh Scandinavian winter comes to an end. Although universities and high schools have shut, pre-schools, kindergartens, bars, restaurants, ski resorts, sports clubs and hairdressers have all remained open. The streets of Stockholm and Malmo are noticeably quieter than usual, but positively bustling compared to those of Copenhagen, Oslo, London, Paris and Rome. Standing in bars is banned but as long as punters can find a seat they’re free to enjoy a night out. Other steps taken include gatherings of more than 50 people being banned and the over 70s being urged to self-isolate.

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Letter To The Editor from Peter Davis

  Re On Target the below may interest you.

There is a very old truism that states: “Tis an ill wind that blows no good.”
It may seem strange to link the world pandemic of Coronavirus with the above truism. But, it is a financial fact that Coronavirus has very clearly demonstrated, world wide, the ease and speed with which enormous sums of “money”, or credit, can be created. America? $3.4 TRILLIONS. Australia? MANY, MANY BILLIONS overnight. An engine requires petrol, or fuel in order to function properly: So, too, does Australia’s economy require “money”, or fuel, to function. The difference between the two is simple. Petrol is a liquid, [something we understand], that we can put in a container or in our fuel tank for our engine to function. However, credit, or money, we do not understand, except we all know we depend upon it for our very existence. Very few people have any idea of the source of our credit, or “fuel” needed for our National engine to run smoothly. The financial catastrophe confronting our Nation due to Coronavirus should be concentrating our “money” thinking. Where, or what, is the source of our sudden money supply? Have we forgotten the necessity of a few weeks ago to deliver a “Budget Surplus”? Have we forgotten our financially starved Economy of a few weeks ago? Have we forgotten the futile interest rate cuts of the Reserve Bank of Australia to stimulate our economy? We would do well to ask our politicians;

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Lessons in Fragility and Frugality By James Reed

     One thing that I think the coronapocalpyse should have taught normies, is that most of modern life is just bs and we can do without almost all of it, and would be better off to. Brett Stevens is smarter than me, as I am nobody, and nothing, and proud of it, and he puts it well:
  http://www.amerika.org/politics/antisocial/

“Crises tend to reveal us, just as characters in novels only come to know themselves when pushed. Our brush with the Wuhan AIDS-Flu has shown two things: first, that our society has no internal loyalty or trust; second, that we can do without most of it and are in fact better off. Did we need three hundred different types of soft drinks? Nope, we needed water, meat/veg, and toilet paper. Did we need three thousand government agencies? Nope, just basic law enforcement. We did not need the entertainment industry, most of the media, or politicians either. People are starting to notice that life without the endless activity for the sake of activity of modern society is not only more peaceful, but less ugly: Within days of the closure, Venetians were startled to see that their canals and perimeter waterways be calmed. Without the usual human tumult churning the waters, the canals were suddenly still and clear. Tourism exists because people need a substitute for the actual good life. They work all year doing little of importance at their tool jobs, taking demands seriously that amount to little more than people grandstanding to seem important so they can claim more money. This money, by the way, comes from the past, and the inventions we made from structured law through technology that enable us to get by with less work. Instead of taking time off, however, we are all in competition for importance, thanks to equality, so we all labor endlessly on make-work.

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If People are Like This Now, Then What Happens When the SHTF Big Time? By John Steele

     Stupid people are taking out their frustrations upon checkout staff, who should not be blamed for rationing. These people are low paid, have long work hours, and a generally terrible job, and should not be abuse. Here one can see a Woolies staff woman in tears:
  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8154113/Woolworths-worker-breaks-tears-treated-poorly-rude-customers-amid-coronavirus.html?ito=push-notification&ci=11401&si=1326534

     Yet, thought this is sad, what worries me is the video of a fight breaking out in a supermarket. This is starting to become more common as civil society breaks down. I am concerned, and you all should be too, that if this is how some people are now, what happens when things get really bad? Like this bad, and beyond:
  http://themostimportantnews.com/archives/brace-for-impact-the-u-s-economy-is-going-down-and-it-is-going-down-hard

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But, Why Italy and Iran? By James Reed

     I have been wondering why Italy and Iran had been heavily hit by the coronavirus. An article by Helen Raleigh, herself an immigrant from China,  at The Federalist explains it. Call me research incompetent, but don’t call me late for dinner, but I could not find the URL for the article, I got it sent by an email.

“The reason these two countries are suffering the most outside China is mainly due to their close ties with Beijing, primarily through the “One Belt and One Road” (OBOR) initiative. OBOR is Beijing’s foreign policy play disguised as infrastructure investment.

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Moving Beyond “Made in China” By James Reed

     Maybe, just, maybe, after the globalists have fully exploited the present biocrisis, there may be a tiny residue of nationalism still left, and at least some important drugs will be once again made in the West, and not China. I have heard nothing about this issue in passive Australia, but in the US, there is some movement at the front:
  https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/china-exploit-control-of-pharmaceutical-exports-by-brahma-chellaney-2020-03
  https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/03/25/watch-marsha-blackburn-end-the-control-the-madmen-in-beijing-have-over-americas-drug-industry/

“Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) called on the United States to rebuild its domestic pharmaceutical manufacturing capacity in order to end China’s monopoly on the drugs Americans rely on. “I encourage my colleagues to support the bipartisan Securing America’s Medicine Cabinet Act,” Blackburn said in a floor speech on Wednesday, as the Senate discussed the coronavirus relief bill. Blackburn opened her remarks by acknowledging the “gross malfeasance” of China’s communist regime in handling the coronavirus pandemic. “After we acknowledge Beijing’s gross malfeasance,” Blackburn said, “we’re going to adjust the way we think about China in the context of the economy, of our national defense, technology, human rights, and pharmaceutical manufacturing.”

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Global communism is Here. Will it be Forever? By James Reed

     If this is not communism, central control gone mad, then I am an monkey’s uncle. What? I did not mean to offend monkeys!
  https://www.naturalnews.com/2020-03-25-gun-stores-closed-la-county-coronavirus-pandemic.html

“Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva announced that gun stores would be declared as “nonessential” businesses and ordered all gun stores in the L.A. county to close down on Tuesday. “There are hundreds of businesses which, through no fault of their own, do not fall under the Governor’s definition of critical infrastructure,” Villanueva said in a press conference. “As a result, I have instructed my deputies to enforce closures of businesses which have disregarded the Governor’s order (gun stores, strip clubs, and other non-designated businesses).” Gun sales in the U.S. have skyrocketed amid the coronavirus crisis. Over the past few weeks, gun stores across the country have seen very long lines and a quick depletion of inventory as many residents turn to their Second Amendment rights for self-protection. However, Villanueva believes that keeping these gun stores open for business amid the pandemic is unnecessary. “We will be closing them, they are not an essential function,” Villanueva said. “I’m a supporter of the 2nd amendment, I’m a gun owner myself, but now you have the mixture of people that are not formerly gun owners and you have a lot more people at home and anytime you introduce a firearm in a home, from what I understand from CDC studies, it increases fourfold the chance that someone is gonna get shot.” The sheriff also plans to beef up patrols by adding 1,300 deputies to his ranks – doubling the current number of officers deployed on the streets – and claims that gun shops who ignore the order and remain open will be summoned to court. Further, Villanueva  announced the release of 1,700 non-violent inmates from county jails to mitigate the risk of the spread of infection throughout the jail system. He claimed that they will be keeping the violent suspects imprisoned no matter what and that those who believe that they won’t be going hard on felons on the streets are sorely mistaken.”

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The Amazing, Fleeing Corporate CEOS, What did They Know? By Chris Knight

     So, the big boys deserted the sinking ship way before we were rioting over toilet paper:
  http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/why-did-hundreds-of-ceos-resign-just-before-the-world-started-going-absolutely-crazy

“One financial publication is using the phrase “the great CEO exodus” to describe the phenomenon that we have been witnessing.  It all started last year when chief executives started resigning in numbers unlike anything that we have ever seen before.  The following was published by NBC News last November… Chief executives are leaving in record numbers this year, with more than 1,332 stepping aside in the period from January through the end of October, according to new data released on Wednesday. While it’s not unusual to see CEOs fleeing in the middle of a recession, it is noteworthy to see such a rash of executive exits amid robust corporate earnings and record stock market highs. Last month, 172 chief executives left their jobs, according to executive placement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. It’s the highest monthly number on record, and the year-to-date total outpaces even the wave of executive exits during the financial crisis. By the end of the year, an all-time record high 1,480 CEOs had left their posts. But to most people it seemed like the good times were still rolling at the end of 2019.  Corporate profits were rising and the stock market was setting record high after record high.”

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Welcome to the Great Depression 2.0: It’s Here! By James Reed

     I am not alone; there are more intelligent voices than me saying what I said days ago, that the Great Depression 2.0 is here, at least by implication:
  https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/morgan-stanley-says-30-gdp-fall-in-q2-2020-03-23

     There are sober reports on this perfect storm of misery too:
  https://usawatchdog.com/greatest-depression-already-started-gerald-celente/

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Coronavirus and Sober Mathematics By Brian Simpson

     There is a sober, or I would say, a grim mathematics, to the coronavirus pandemic. Take lockdowns for example. I was in town today and it was as sparse as on Good Friday, or shall we call our days, “Bad Fridays”? Businesses shut, few people working. This is less than a week …  what will things be like with a full six months or year of this? Lock downs of Western countries are hard enough, but what about locking down the vast population of India:
  https://www.zerohedge.com/health/heres-what-21-day-lockdown-indias-13bn-people-looks

“Or rather we should ask whether this is even possible, given that as of the first night following Prime Minister Narendra Modi announcing in a televised address the immediate lockdown which orders some one-fifth of the world's population to 'stay indoors' it looks like the authorities will have serious enforcement issues on their hands in the coming Even his word choice left little ambiguity: “To save India and every Indian, there will be a total ban on venturing out,” Modi said Tuesday.days. Technically the order begins Wednesday, but it still set off a panic as anxious throngs descended on shopping markets, causing police to in some cases intervene and attempt to disperse the swelling crowds. Modi said in his speech the 'alternative' to not shutting the country down would ultimately set back the economy back 21 years, while also acknowledging India will take a big hit anyway, while pledging to inject $2 billion into country's vulnerable health care system.”

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