Stranded at Sea by James Reed

South Korean shipper, Hanjin, has filed for bankruptcy protection. (Collapse New.com, September 9, 2016) Hanjin handled around 8 per cent of the Trans-Pacific trade volume. As the company cannot pay its bills, most nations have not allowed its ships to dock. This means that billions of dollars of goods needed in manufacture will not be delivered unless a government bailout occurs. Whatever happens, there is likely to be a major disruption to globalism. Already freight rates are now reaching US $ 2,300 per container.

The incident shows the extreme vulnerability of the globalist experiment. Take out only a few building blocks, such as shipping, and the whole house of cards topples.

Naughty Nukes by Tom North

An article which appeared in the journal Risk Analysis, S. Wheatley (et al.), “Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents and Accidents,” (The Australian, September, 20, 2016, p. 9), has argued that the risks of nuclear power are significantly underestimated because of an under-reporting of accidents. The criticisms were addressed to the International Atomic Energy Agency, which is supposed to collect reports of nuclear accidents and rate them.
However, this organisation has no published database, so that this assessment cannot be checked.
The authors of the Risk Analysis paper also claimed that the methodology used in assessment downplays the severity of large events.

The International Atomic Energy Agency, which also has the role of promoting the use of nuclear energy, thus has a fundamental conflict of interest.
This downplaying of nuclear risks means that through complacency the risk of a Fukushima-magnitude accident is “more probable than not” in our lifetime. That could mean the end of human civilisation, if a runaway meltdown occurs which is not contained. Apparently that would not be good for business, and migrants are not attracted to post-apocalyptic radioactive wastelands for some reason.

Ending Australian Immigration: Start with “Humanitarian” Migrants by James Reed

Following on from the Productivity Commission’s report into immigration, some articles semi-critical of immigration have appeared in the generally “Big Australia” The Australian, September 20, 2016: Judith Sloan, “Winners, Losers in Migrant Economy,” and Nick Cater, “Outdated Multicultural Model Swamps Us.”

By way of background, the Productivity Commission, among other things, was critical of the humanitarian migration scheme. The economic prospects of these type of migrants is poor and even after five years from arrival, employment is lower than the general population, all with a cost of at least $ 3.2 billion per year. The Productivity Commission did not embrace the mantra of “diversity,” but instead felt that a “deterioration in the integration of immigrants would be detrimental to Australia.”

Continue reading

U.S. Allies 'Volunteer' To Share (Implausible) Blame For Deir Ezzor Attack

Ref: http://www.moonofalabama.org/2016/09/us-allies-volunteer-to-share-blame-for-deir-ezzor-attack.html#more

...Early Sunday Australia jumped in claiming its jets had taken part in the attack:

Continue reading

Russia Has No Partners In The West by Paul Craig Roberts

Ref: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article45499.htm
The Russian government is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. The Russian government keeps making agreements with Washington, and Washington keeps breaking them.

This latest exercise in what Einstein defined as insanity is the latest Syrian cease fire agreement. Washington broke the agreement by sending the US Air Force to bomb Syrian troop positions, killing 62 Syrian soldiers and wounding 100, thus clearing the way for ISIS to renew the attack.
Russia caught Washington off guard in September 2015 when the Russian Air Force was sent to bomb ISIS positions in Syria, thus enabling the Syrian Army to regain the initiative. Russia had the war against ISIS won, but pulled out unexpectedly before the job was done. This allowed the US or its agents to resupply ISIS, which renewed the attack.

Continue reading

Vitaly Churkin Response On Obama Attack In Syria


"I've never seen such an extraordinary display over American handedness as we're witnessing today"

Continue reading

US-led coalition aircraft strike Syrian army positions, kill 62 soldiers – military

US-led coalition jets have bombed Syrian government forces’ positions near the eastern city of Deir ez-Zor, killing 62 troops and "paving the way" for Islamic State militants, the Syrian Army General Command told the state television.

The bombing took place on al-Tharda Mountain in the region of Deir ez-Zor and caused casualties and destruction on the ground, Syria’s official SANA news agency reported on Saturday.Sixty-two Syrian soldiers were killed and over 100 injured in the airstrike by the US-led coalition, Russia’s Defense Ministry spokesman, Major-General Igor Konashenkov, said, citing information received from the Syrian General Command.
Read more here: https://www.rt.com/news/359678-us-strikes-syrian-army/

Continue reading

Migration Costs: A Never-Ending Story by James Reed

Sitting on page one of The Australian (September 13, 2016), right next to the story and photos of home-grown terrorist Ihsas Khan who engaged in a 9/11 stabbing, we have this news: “Parents of Migrants to Cost $3.2 bn.” Yes, yet another cost of our out-of-control migration programme.

The $3.2 billion figure is from the Productivity Commission who recommends that permanent visas for parents of migrants be abolished or a greater increase in fees made. Loopholes are permitting masses of people with inadequate skills and English language to gain permanent residency, all at taxpayer’s expense.

Continue reading

Finally, Some Sense on the Submarine Fiasco by James Reed

A group of concerned businessmen, including Dick Smith, put a full-page advertisement in The Australian (September 13, 2016) condemning Turnbull’s “Submarine Fiasco.”

The bottom line: $50 billion will be spent for 2,800 jobs. This is an absurd cost, especially since at present there is not one operational French Barracuda submarine in service. The first version, yet to be launched, is in a ship yard and is nuclear not diesel. The government wants to retrofit and re-design a nuclear sub to be diesel, which has never been done. Good luck with that one, because we will need it.

Continue reading

The Free Trade Delusion by James Reed

Whatever you think about the promises made by Donald Trump, he looks certain, if he wins, of rejecting the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). That is a good thing, meaning one less globalist scheme to fight. But even so, for the globalists, who have something of a fetish for the letter T, there is still the TISA a “turbo-charged privatisation pact” backed by Microsoft, Google, IBM, Walmart and JP Morgan Chase.

TTSA stands for “Trade In Services Agreement.” And like the TPP is being negotiated in secret. The TISA will privatise public services, replacing governments with Big Corporations. Like the TPP, there is thought to be clauses in it preventing governments from regulating banks and controlling strategic services.

Continue reading

Waking in Fright to the Problem of China by James Reed

A number of academics and journalists are beginning to think critically about China. This contrasts with the cargo cult attitude of the former prime minister who did so much to make Australia a part of Asia with his massive Asian immigration programme – John Howard. Don’t ban Chinese political donations he says (The Australian, September 12, 2016, p. 4) even though “we are living in this quite unique situation where we’re dealing with an authoritarian communist country which has a dominant economic influence in this country.”

That, in my opinion, is just incoherent. An authoritarian communist country is something to be feared, by definition! The Liberals have clearly forgotten the meaning of the word “liberalism.”

Continue reading

Australia needs a Paris Plebiscite 
by Viv Forbes

The Clexit Coalition calls on the Australian Government to conduct a plebiscite on whether Australia should withdraw from the Paris Climate Treaty.

The Clexit (ClimateExit) Coalition, comprising over 170 representatives from 25 countries, was launched in London last week. It aims to prevent ratification or local enforcement of the UN Paris climate treaty.


Australia is vulnerable to the destructive energy policies being promoted in the UN’s war on carbon fuels.

Australia is a huge continent in a far corner of the world, suffering from what that great historian Geoffrey Blainey called ‘The Tyranny of Distance’.


Continue reading

The Privatisation of National Credit and Money-Printing by Jeremy Lee (Australia 2000- How Bright The Vision?)


This expansion of the money supply occurs every year; a smaller increase during a credit squeeze, accelerating when the Reserve Bank believes the economy needs stimulating. The controlling mechanism is now largely confined to the raising or lowering of interest rates.

It can also be seen that the creation of Australia’s monetary requirements - which many believe should be a Government prerogative - has been ceded almost entirely into private-sector hands. New money is put into circulation through loans and overdrafts, on which the ‘creators’ earn interest, and charge fees for operating accounts. They are not lending their own capital. They are claiming ownership of “new” money which is practically costless, and which should, in a just system, belong to the community.

Continue reading

Assad’s Death Warrant by Mike Whitney

“Secret cables and reports by the U.S., Saudi and Israeli intelligence agencies indicate that the moment Assad rejected the Qatari pipeline, military and intelligence planners quickly arrived at the consensus that fomenting a Sunni uprising in Syria to overthrow the uncooperative Bashar Assad was a feasible path to achieving the shared objective of completing the Qatar/Turkey gas link. In 2009, according to WikiLeaks, soon after Bashar Assad rejected the Qatar pipeline, the CIA began funding opposition groups in Syria.”
— Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Why the Arabs don’t want us in Syria, Politico

"Counterpunch" - The conflict in Syria is not a war in the conventional sense of the word. It is a regime change operation, just like Libya and Iraq were regime change operations.
The main driver of the conflict is the country that’s toppled more than 50 sovereign governments since the end of World War 2.  (See: Bill Blum here.) We’re talking about the United States of course.
Washington is the hands-down regime change champion, no one else even comes close. That being the case, one might assume that the American people would notice the pattern of intervention, see through the propaganda and assign blame accordingly. But that never  seems to happen and it probably won’t happen here either. No matter how compelling the evidence may be, the brainwashed American people always believe their government is doing the right thing.

Continue reading

The Vexed Question of DNA Ownership by Ian Wilson LL.B

An ABC “Curious Canberra” article, “Who Owns My DNA When I Send it Off for Analysis?” September 12, 2016, has again drawn attention to an area where there is a great gap in the law, and where the science is way ahead of policy.

In the United States there have been a number of cases where this issue has been examined, most notably Moore v Regents of California (1990), heard by the Supreme Court of California. There, it was held that cells taken from a patient are not their property and therefore individuals have no rights to profits made by Big Med in use of the cells. The problem with the case is that the decision should have examined the information about the cells rather than the physical cells themselves, so the issue was not resolved. Other US cases have also upheld the rights of Big Med, seeing the social interest of medical research and corporate profits overriding personal privacy.

Continue reading

China and Imperialist Domination by James Reed

Behind the political donations debate is the important issue of the rise of China, and how this communist power is choosing to exert its power. Defenders of China typically adopt a “business-as-usual” model, pointing out that US and British foreign investment in Australia is higher than Chinese investment (for the moment), and that there should be no discrimination against china because there is no morally relevant criteria to discriminate between nations in the free trade love-in.

Bob Carr, former foreign minister (The Weekend Australian, September 10-11, 2016, p. 18), pushes this style of argument: “Chinese-Australians are not Maoists and the rulers in Beijing are hardly fanatical jihadists.” Why, if all the criticisms now appearing in the media were correct, then Australia should not have entered into free trade agreements with China at all, Carr says. And in reply to this rhetoric, one can heartily agree: yes, it is a profound mistake.

Continue reading

Social Credit and Foreign Trade by Wallace Klinck

"Obviously, if nations cannot absorb their own consumer production because of a lack of effective demand (i.e., unencumbered purchasing-power) and are forced to compensate by obtaining excess export earnings and seeking foreign investment it will be impossible to maintain cultural integrity as the financial pressures exert their inevitable and inexorable influence. 

While it makes sense for nations to trade in order to obtain otherwise unavailable and required resources and/or to reap the efficiency benefits of comparative advantage, it makes no sense and is destructive of national sovereignty to be forced into international trade merely to join in a multi-national (and futile) scramble to capture scarce credits necessary to facilitate the sale of domestic production. 

Continue reading

Letter to The Editor

of The Stock Journal
Mr Tony Mahar’s support for Foreign Ownership (Stock Journal 25/8/16) is a view unfortunately held by some senior politicians and businessmen.  It is particularly unfortunate in Mr Mahar’s case since he heads the National Farmers’ Federation, an organisation with rank and file members expecting their leaders to promote, protect and nurture their industry and assets.

Around the world, most countries either severely restrict or even prohibit the sale of farmland to foreigners.  The Japanese economy has been declining for twenty years and yet I would not be able to buy any of their land. So why is Australia needing to assist the economy by eagerly displaying the “For Sale” sign?

Continue reading

More Vaccine Adverse Effects by Mrs Vera West

According to the MSRI website: Children’s Medical Safety Research Institute, August 30, 2016, the shingles vaccine, Zostamax, has two FDA-approved changes to its warning label: “The first was in August 2014, when, in addition to potentially causing chickenpox, another side effect was added: shingles! …
The vaccine that had been – and continues to be – aggressively marketed to prevent seniors from contracting this excruciating condition was found to actually cause shingles in some individuals.”

In February 2016 the FDA approved another label change to warn of another potential side effect: the eye disorder of necrotizing retinitis, which inflames and scars eye tissue and unless promptly treated can lead to permanent vision loss.

Continue reading

Three Cheers for Loyal Chinese Aussies! by James Reed

If you don’t like this country’s values, and think of another place as your country, then go back there!
Strong words indeed. But before professional ethnics reach for their magic section 18 C ultimate nullifier weapon, consider that these words are a quote from John Hu, a Chinese Australian and founder of the Embracing Australian Values Alliance. (The Australian, September 5, 2016, p.2)
Have ye of the multicult released the cock on your hair trigger section 18 C gun yet?

John Hu may be just the man this torn and bleeding country needs, too. He will be able to challenge things that Anglo critics have difficulties doing because of the political weapon of section 18 C. He has criticised political donations, noting that in the case of Chinese political donations, “they may donate on behalf of the Chinese government to influence Australian politics, to penetrate and control positions, for example, on the South China Sea – and some of the money may actually be coming from China. In China, business and government work extremely closely.”

Continue reading