Now Maori Land Rights …In Australia By James Reed

     No, it is not a joke … well …sometimes I am not sure nowadays what to believe, but here goes:
  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7381313/Maori-group-makes-claim-valuable-piece-land-Australia.html?ico=pushly-notifcation-small
  https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/maori-group-lays-claim-to-land-in-western-sydney/ar-AAG7oJa?li=AAgfYrC&ocid=mailsignout

“A group of Maori people are calling for valuable land in Sydney's west to be handed over to them, claiming they were gifted the area by Aboriginal people more than 200 years ago. The Rangihou people say their king was handed the land in Parramatta by leaders of the Burramattagal Clan back in 1811 after they were first invited over from New Zealand. The 45-hectare parcel of land lies in an eastern section of central Parramatta. It includes parkland, James Ruse Reserve, Robin Thomas Reserve, Rangihou Reserve and a section of the Parramatta River. 'We are Ngati Rangihou Corrangie Hapu and we are here to reclaim Rangihou land,' the group's leader Lady Crown told 9 News. 'We want acknowledgement and recognition. We want the history books corrected, and compensation for damages of the land. 'We have the first laws in time, so our laws stand above any other law in the land.' The Rangihou people attempted to seize some of the land in March by changing the locks on the Waratah Soccer Club. They also charged people to use the car park of their makeshift set-up, before being evicted after four days.”

Continue reading

We Will, We will …Replace You! Sing It! By Chris Knight

     Every time I hear that song from the pop group Queen, we will, we will rock you, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tJYN-eG1zk. I think of the Left and the Great Replacement, which they say is a conspiracy of the Dissent right, even though in their quiet moments the Left openly celebrate it, as all suicide cults do, longing for death. It is the way of decadence.  Here is a good recent article by American Renaissance bringing us up to speed on how the Great Replacement program is proceeding, at least in the US:
  https://www.amren.com/news/2019/08/the-lefts-message-we-will-replace-you/

“Contempt for whites is mainstream. Cable news pundits, influential Democrats, and newspaper columnists happily promote white replacement. Last week, black AboveTheLaw editor and frequent MSNBC guest Elie Mystal called for the subjugation of white Donald Trump supporters. “You don’t communicate to them, you beat them,” he said on AM Joy. “You beat them. They are not a majority of this country—the majority of white people in this country are not a majority of the country. . . . You do not negotiate with these people, you destroy them.” CNN anchor Anderson Cooper recently looked forward to whites becoming a minority: “The idea that, you know, whites will not be the majority, I mean, that’s—it’s an exciting transformation of the country, it’s an exciting evolution and you know, progress of our country in many different ways.” His guest, Univision host Jorge Ramos, agreed. “There’s nothing really they can do against this incredible demographic revolution,” he said. A week before, actress Rosanna Arquette tweeted: “I’m sorry I was born white and privileged. It disgusts me. And I feel so much shame.” She later claimed the FBI advised her to lock her Twitter account due to the backlash. Liberals insist white supremacy dominates America. If that were true, those of us who write openly about the great replacement and the rights of whites would be honored and enriched. The corporate media would condemn anyone who insulted whites. Employers would fire them. Instead, anti-white racism can advance your career. Just ask Sarah Jeong, a New York Times editorial board member who got her job despite (or because of) her anti-white tweets.

Continue reading

Letter to The Editor - The whole campaign for "indigenous constitutional recognition" has been mistaken

To The Australian        Lyle Geyer states (26/8) that "it is absolutely imperative that an urgent solution is forthcoming" to the problems of Aboriginal disadvantage. Such issues are usually not well handled if rushed. What is most of all needed is solutions that are effective and in accord with reality. Two things should be dropped. The whole campaign for "indigenous constitutional recognition" has been mistaken and this needs to be firmly admitted. It will never be endorsed by a majority of Australians at the necessary referendum, because it is inequitable and dangerously divisive. Secondly, the phrase "closing the gap" should be replaced by "improvement to Aboriginal living conditions". "Closing the gap" allows ideological pests to go on complaining forever rather than addressing real needs sensibly.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - Honouring of the clear verdict of the 2016 referendum

To The Age        Discussion of Brexit needs to be based on a clear grasp of priorities ("Leak reveals no-deal chaos fear", 19/8). Short-term disruption of lifestyle for many is less significant than three other factors which show that Boris Johnson and his Conservative government should be supported and Remainers yield the field gracefully. These are, in order of importance, the regaining of its sovereignty by Britain, the restoration of complete legal and judicial independence to the British people (meaning freedom from the quasi-totalitarian European Court of Human Rights) and the honouring of the clear verdict of the 2016 referendum (thus allowing genuine democracy to succeed).
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

Letter to The Editor - Also very important is the sheer lack of equity in the whole concept

To The Australian        Chris Mitchell fails to provide a truly comprehensive report on the reasoning of opponents of Aboriginal constitutional recognition ("'Feel-good' SMH missing when debate on Aboriginal voice gets serious", 19/8). Opposition to an improper insertion of race into the Constitution is not the main issue, but, rather, the danger of serious political division on this continent in the middle to long term. With totalitarian China on the move, this is a life-or-death matter for the Australian nation. Also very important is the sheer lack of equity in the whole concept. Mitchell is no doubt right, however, to point out that those Aboriginal Australians behind this campaign will not "give up their aspirations" and "surrender". Nor will their non-indigenous supporters. It will be a long fight for us savvy Australians to maintain the integrity and unity of our fundamentally British nation; but we will not give up either; and we will win.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Oh, This is Embarrassing! By James Reed

     The ever-eagled eye Andre Bolt has pointed out something mighty interesting that I did not know about, even given my great expanse of “knowledge,” gained from years of dedicated drinking in bars for wisdom, while listening to talk back radio:
  https://www.heraldsun.com.au/blogs/andrew-bolt/plagiarism-uluru-statement-from-a-congolese-heart/news-story/d315bb99c166c13d93fc1e21246fcb5d

“The Uluru Statement from the Heart, written allegedly by Aboriginal representatives, has quickly become the approved definition of the special nature of Aboriginal sovereignty: This sovereignty is a spiritual notion: the ancestral tie between the land, or ‘mother nature’, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who were born therefrom, remain attached thereto, and must one day return thither to be united with our ancestors. This was presented as a statement straight from the heart of the delegates to a 2017 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Referendum Convention at Uluru:

Continue reading

Letter to the Editor - I doubt that the Stone Age hunter-and-gatherer culture of the Aboriginals achieved anything remotely comparable in its long occupation of this continent

To The Australian         As a graduate of the University of Melbourne, I am outraged that Duncan Maskell, the present vice-chancellor, has wrongfully dishonoured the achievements of the university since its foundation ("Lessons of Garma shape the future", 14/8). His claim that the university's "history pales into insignificance compared with the thousands of years of history and culture" of Aboriginals, put forward without any substantiating evidence, is sentimental and populist rhetoric. The university has a distinguished history of achievement by its scholars since its foundation, including discoveries of worldwide importance. Moreover, its history extends back through the European university tradition to the learning centres of the ancient world, Egyptian, Greek and Roman. I doubt that the Stone Age hunter-and-gatherer culture of the Aboriginals achieved anything remotely comparable in its long occupation of this continent. Maskell shows no awareness of the powerful case that has been brought against Aboriginal constitutional recognition by a number of our leading intellectuals. Has he read Keith Windschuttle's books, for instance?
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - He is misleading to complain about "the Anglo-Celtic imprint on this nation"

To The Australian        Labor senator Pat Dodson is the latest Aboriginal leader to damage his cause ("Leaders fear loss of 'Anglo imprint'", 10-11/8). Insulting us by claiming erroneously that "Australia has very little to celebrate in its own right" apart from democracy is amazingly foolish. Has Dodson forgotten the heroism of the early explorers, the industry of the pioneers, the Anzac spirit and the proud record of our men and women at war, the dedicated leadership that led to Federation, the planting of churches across the continent, the works of our artists from Elioth Gruner and Norman Lindsay to Wlliam Dargie and John Brack, our literary tradition that runs from Banjo Paterson and Henry Lawson to Patrick White and Martin Boyd? He is misleading to complain about "the Anglo-Celtic imprint on this nation". Australia really is an Anglo-Celtic nation. As for his feigned blindness to the reasons for Australians' fear of Aboriginal constitutional recognition, it is as reprehensible as his claim that there has been a longstanding failure of magnanimity towards Aboriginals. The reverse is the truth.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - I fear that foolish change of our political order could lead to a quasi-Marxist tyranny

To The Australian     David Hind asks of Australians generally (9/8): "What are we afraid of?" Why the opposition to Aboriginal constitutional recognition? Well, immediately I'm afraid of the damage such a move would do to the Constitution, which currently treats all of us on equal terms. I'm worried about the abandonment of ethical principle involved. Also, I don't welcome the prospect of unelected judges of the High Court being given more power at the expense of parliament, especially when I consider the court's track record from Mabo until its latest damage to free speech. Finally, I fear that foolish change of our political order could lead to a quasi-Marxist tyranny here and/or the setting up of an Aboriginal nation (thanks to the extension of land rights legislation) which might invite China to become its ally. I like the Australia that my ancestors established here and I want to pass it on to my descendants.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

Letter to The Editor - Ken Wyatt should go further than warn of problems if a referendum fails

To The Age        Anthony Albanese is being unrealistic on Aboriginal affairs ("Albanese in Indigenous 'voice' push", 3/8). The "gap" in living conditions between Aboriginals and the rest of us is unlikely to be closed, because of the lower intellectual capacities of Aboriginals as a group. Facing realities of ethnic differences is scientific; not facing them is superstitious and political opportunism. Asserting that "we are all diminished" if the Constitution is not invaded to satisfy selfish demands from "indigenous" leaders is just hot air, as is the belligerence shown towards the Constitution by an Aboriginal leader at the current Garma festival. As for any manufactured "bipartisanship" among the major political parties, that won't alter the resistance by ordinary Australians to a policy of national suicide. Ken Wyatt should go further than warn of problems if a referendum fails. He should admit that this particular campaign is a dead duck with the punters.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Why is Australia Set to Dump Cash? By James Reed

     The good people of the Citizens Electoral Council of Australian a Media Release Tuesday, 30 July 2019, have put the case that Morrison is set on banning cash, to prevent Australians escaping the bail-in, negative interest rates. I think that they have put their finger on what is clicking over here:

“The fight against “bail-in” is on! The Morrison government has released for consultation a new law that bans cash transactions over $10,000. The pretext for this law is to crack down on money laundering and tax evasion in the “black economy”. This is a shameless lie! The formal recommendation to ban cash comes from “big four” global accounting firm … which is an accomplice of the world’s biggest money launderers and tax evaders. The real purpose for the cash ban is to trap Australians in the banking system, so they cannot escape negative interest rates or having their bank deposits “bailed in”. Scott Morrison first announced this measure in the 2018 budget, originally to come into force this month, but now scheduled for January 2020. It was recommended in the October 2017 Black Economy Taskforce Report by Michael Andrew AO (who died last month) … The report revealed that the strategy is to: “Move people and businesses out of cash and into the banking system, which makes economic activity more visible, auditable and efficient.” (Emphasis added.) It gives the game away by noting that it may benefit “financial stability and the effectiveness of monetary policy”—code for policies like bail-in and negative interest rates. To achieve this it recommended: “Moving to a near cash free economy. A $10,000 economy-wide cash limit should be introduced.” But $10,000 is just the beginning: in June 2018, just after Morrison announced it,  …  was already lobbying Treasury to lower the limit to $5,000 or even $2,000.

Continue reading

You Had Better Do What He Says Or … He Will Throw the Constitution in the Sea! By James Reed

     That’s it; we can see Them really getting down to the democratic spirit off constitutional change, as expressed in the indigenous referendum, the latest gee-whiz thing of our new class elites.  Look, let these folks speak for themselves, because, I am what, just a deplorable voter, only deserving to be thrown in the sea:
  https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/fix-it-or-well-throw-constitution-into-sea-galarrwuy-yunupingu/news-story/457098fca760d750c1235dd029ef9964

“One of Australia’s most respected Aboriginal leaders, Galarrwuy -Yunupingu, has made what he ¬describes as a final demand for substantive constitutional reforms, threatening that the Yolngu people of Arnhem Land will throw the nation’s founding document into the sea if change does not come soon. In a strident speech to open the Garma festival on Aboriginal land in the far northeast corner of the Northern Territory late yesterday, Dr Yunupingu issued his warning directly to the face of Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt, who was in the front row of the audience. The two men were facing each other and seated almost knee to knee — Dr Yunupingu in his wheelchair — when the Yolngu leader said, “Enough is enough”. “We are thinking of our Constitution, how we can change it and make it a real law for Yolngu people as well as Balanda (non-¬indigenous) people,” he said. “We are doing that, asking for the rights to be accepted by the commonwealth government and by everybody else.”

Continue reading

Letter to The Editor - That won't alter the resistance by ordinary Australians to a policy of national suicide

To The Age         Anthony Albanese is being unrealistic on Aboriginal affairs ("Albanese in Indigenous 'voice' push", 3/8). The "gap" in living conditions between Aboriginals and the rest of us is unlikely to be closed, because of the lower intellectual capacities of Aboriginals as a group. Facing realities of ethnic differences is scientific; not facing them is superstitious and political opportunism. Asserting that "we are all diminished" if the Constitution is not invaded to satisfy selfish demands from "indigenous" leaders is just hot air, as is the belligerence shown towards the Constitution by an Aboriginal leader at the current Garma festival. As for any manufactured "bipartisanship" among the major political parties, that won't alter the resistance by ordinary Australians to a policy of national suicide. Ken Wyatt should go further than warn of problems if a referendum fails. He should admit that this particular campaign is a dead duck with the punters.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Changing Races; Changing Places By Chris Knight

     A good article by Steve Sailer on the emerging issue in America, as the build up to civil War II: can American Whites prevent the rising tide of colour, that threatens to demographically displace them, and is doing this racist, and if it is racist, then will the sky fall?
  https://www.takimag.com/article/our-new-planet-is-going-to-be-great/

“The fundamental issue of the 2020 presidential campaign is rapidly becoming whether or not America’s whites, as exemplified in the person of Donald Trump, have the right to block the world’s blacks and Muslims, as exemplified in the person of Somalia-born Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), from immigrating en masse to the United States. Or is the entire notion of white citizens democratically voting to keep out nonwhites too racistly triggering for more enlightened entities, such as the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, to allow? The United Nations’ publication last month of its World Population Prospects 2019 adds important perspective to this question. For example, in 1991, when Omar’s family fled Somalia due to their complicity in the genocidal regime of the dictator Siad Barre, the population of Somalia was only 7 million. Today, 28 chaotic years later, Somalia has more than doubled in size to 15 million despite immense outflows of emigrants. The U.N. forecasts that Somalia’s population will reach 35 million in 2050 and 76 million in 2100. Alternatively, millions of Somalis (or, quite possibly, tens of millions of Somalis) might prefer to follow Rep. Omar to the Magic Dirt of the first world. According to a Gallup poll, at present one-third of the population of sub-Saharan African wants to migrate, and it’s unlikely that additional population growth will make Africa more attractive. Here’s my latest update of what I call The Most Important Graph in the World:

Continue reading

Letter to the Editor - There are too many good arguments against which remain unanswered

To The Age        Labor frontbench MP Linda Burney claims that there is "enormous support" for enshrining a proposed Aboriginal voice in the Constitution ("MPs warn of failure in campaign", 31/7). Is she engaging in wishful thinking? If in any referendum the "No" case is properly financed and supported by the government as well as the "Yes" case, it is most unlikely that the referendum will succeed. There are too many good arguments against which remain unanswered. If Scott Morrison and his colleagues are having second thoughts on this matter, good on them! They will be wise to insist that the interests of all Australians need to be consulted and respected.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

There are too many good arguments against which remain unanswered

To The Australian        Former High Court chief justice Robert French simply ignores the cogent arguments which have been brought up against any kind of amendment to the Constitution favouring the Aborigines ("Voice of reason is not beyond us", 31/7). He states, correctly, that "recognition is a fact". That is true and that is where it should end. However, he adds that recognition in the Constitution "would reflect an existing national growth of respect for our First Peoples." He does not say how or why; and there is reason to suspect that popular affection for the Aborigines is actually waning a little as more and more Australians become aware that "the Aboriginal industry" is engaging in selfish demands at the expense of the rest of us. French concludes that "the creation of a national consensus should not be beyond our wit." That is dreamtime stuff! Australia is deeply split on this issue and thus any referendum appears doomed.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - The momentum for disastrous damage to the political order of this nation may not be "unstoppable"

To The Australian        Nick Cater rightly analyses the dangers inherent in that "radical manifesto", the Uluru Statement from the Heart ("Poverty at core of this inequity", 29/7), but his realism deserts him when he adds that, on relevant constitutional reform, "there can be no doubt on which side Scott Morrison's government stands". Alas, contrary to Cater's apparent supposition, it is on the wrong side, as shown by the PM's appointment of a noted Aboriginal industry activist (Ken Wyatt) to a ministry charged with preparing for a referendum to enable some form of Aboriginal recognition within the Constitution. The momentum for disastrous damage to the political order of this nation may not be "unstoppable", but it is intense and most courageous statesmanship will be needed to halt it. Will there be a better moment for reversal of direction than now, when the PM's approval rating is up? Morrison should (1) admit publicly that there is grave concern about our national future in this context, (2) instruct Wyatt to set up a committee to review the whole topic, a committee with significant (majority) Anglo membership, and (3) foreshadow the result by stating that the Government does not see change to the Constitution as necessarily the right way to go for management of Aboriginal issues. Continued temporising plays into the hands of the enemy.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

The Mitcham City Council … Who? By James Reed

     I heard about this one from my brother who has a nice house in the leafy Adelaide suburb of Mitcham (near Unley High School, where Julia Gillard apparently went to). Mitcham is south of the city centre, basically divided by Unley Road. It is mainly white Anglo middle class, like my brother. But, political correctness has crept in even there:

“It will be a silent night by Brownhill Creek this Christmas, after Mitcham Council dumped its highly popular carols night. The council decision ends 25 years of the Carols By The Creek event, which regularly attracted more than 5000 people. The seven councillors who voted to abolish the carols cited its cost (about $45,000) and said the event was not inclusive for non-Christians. Hundreds of readers on Advertiser.com.au and our Facebook page have slammed the decision. At 6pm on Thursday the poll further down this story had 90 per cent of respondents calling on the council to reinstate the event. During a narrow 7:5 vote to discontinue the event, Cr Darren Kruse said he was happy to be known as the “Christmas Grinch”. “Council should not be funding what fundamentally is a religious event with no co-contribution from the churches,” Cr Kruse said during an hour-long debate on the issue. “It’s not inclusive because it talks to one major religion … the Christian religion … although it is dominant, that is not our demographic. “If the churches want to run it, they should run it.” Cr Karen Hockley said the carols night ignored those who “might never go to a traditional Christmas event”. She said continuing to run the event supported the “old regime” and that the council needed to be “cleverer than that” and support diversity through other events. But she recognised the decision could cause controversy and be regarded as a “step too far” for the community, particularly in light of the council’s 3.67 per cent rate rise in 2019/20. “We’ve given them (ratepayers) the biggest rate rise in the state and then removed the most-visible use of their rates,” she said. “(This is) a sleight of hand that is not going to be tolerated by the community.” Council staff will prepare a report detailing the options for other groups to hold a “slimmed-down” carols event.”

Continue reading

Letter to The Editor - Giving a very small and ill-defined group unfair advantages

To The Age        Rachel Perkins quotes former chief justice Murray Gleeson's claim that the dispossession of our Aboriginal tribes "underwrote the development of the nation" ("Saluting a Liberal who understands", 25/7). That is a contestable assertion. It can as truly or more truly be affirmed that the Aboriginals' loss was caused by their failure to defend their territory and that the subsequent development of Australia resulted from the knowledge, skills and efforts of the newcomers. She wants "constitutional reforms" to "empower" her people and give them their "rightful place" in "their own country". What this means for other Australians (97%) is changes for the worse giving a very small and ill-defined group unfair advantages that might lead eventually to the establishment of a separate Aboriginal nation. Any "sense of estrangement" really felt by Aboriginals needs to be addressed in a wiser fashion than constitutional change.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

Letter to The Editor - If the government finally concedes that the idea of constitutional recognition is unjust

To The Australian        Henry Ergas, in methodically demolishing some of the latest arguments in favour of Aboriginal constitutional recognition ("This voice would have us shouting over the walls", 26/7), warns that enactment of the proposed "voice to Parliament" could "set off a dynamic whose effects are starkly at odds with its supporters' objectives." Well, yes and no, for while some of the advocates for the cause are good-hearted and well-intentioned, others, as can be seen from their words and actions in recent years, are not. They positively want trouble in order to further their cause of cleaving Australia in two. Ergas foresees unpleasant consequences if the government of the day rejects claims by this putative new body: resentment, fury and a damaging row. That negative behaviour will also manifest if the government finally concedes that the idea of constitutional recognition is unjust (which it is) or fated to lose any referendum. Australians generally must brace themselves with courage to face unpleasantness no matter what course the government adopts.
It would be better to face the music now, before it gets louder!
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic