Letter to The Editor - They are kith and kin of the majority of us Australians

To The Australian        Australia appears to be shirking a family obligation ("Don't deny us sanctuary, white farmers tell Dutton", 19/6). The government should honour the policy espoused last year by Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton to effect a special refugee intake of persecuted white South Africans. We owe this to these people because they are kith and kin of the majority of us Australians. We admire Jews and Aboriginals for fighting for the interests of their peoples, even if we disagree with some of their policies. So why not the same loyalty to our own? Moreover, they will make excellent new Australians and benefit the whole nation.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - Threatening our internal stability and national security

To The Australian        Neither John Wylie ("Indigenous call deserves response from the heart", 18/6) nor Kenneth Wiltshire ("Voice to Parliament too important to get wrong", 18/6) has provided a successful and convincing case for constitutional recognition of indigenous Australians. As for Wylie's vague, sentimental and untrustworthy assertions, Australians generally are under no obligation, legal, moral or spiritual, to engage in "a generous and respectful accommodation with indigenous Australians." He does not address the questionable status in the context of constitutional change, of Australians identifying as "indigenous" or the consequent doubt as to the validity of their case. As for Wiltshire, it is ingenuous of him to state that "it is hard not to wonder what all the fuss is about regarding this proposal", when he makes no effort to counter the well-established case that constitutional entrenchment in any form would be fundamentally divisive of this nation, threatening our internal stability and national security, and also fundamentally inequitable towards all non-indigenous Australians.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - Sheer political power of the "Remain" camp

To The Age        You are right that any new Conservative leader in the UK will need to show good judgment and diplomatic skill in seeking a viable path forward for the nation ("Johnson as PM not a comforting thought", 17/6). However, the "great complexities" of achieving constitutional severance of Britain from the EU are not beyond the power of Boris Johnson or any other prime minister and his team. What may prove more intractable is the sheer political power of the "Remain" camp who naturally do not feel that "a narrowly won referendum" de-authorises their resistance. The British people as a whole need to bring goodwill, integrity, magnanimity and intelligent compromise to bear in this fraught situation. Let us hope they find a fruitful way forward.

  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

Letter the The Editor - Concerning a Bill of Rights

     It doesn’t take much of an issue to generate calls for a Bill of Rights. People believe it will enhance their freedoms. In fact a Bill of Rights can restrict freedoms because it actually prescribes all rights available.  Obviously then, any ‘right’ not mentioned is forbidden. Our system provides us maximum freedom where we have the lawful right to do anything except the minimum number of things which are forbidden. Not having a Bill of rights can be likened to our road rules where we are free to drive wherever we choose provided we obey any road rules like speed limits and “No Entry” signs.
  Ken Grundy

Letter to The Editor - For some months you appear to have censored out of existence that large body of Australians firmly opposed to any form of "indigenous constitutional recognition"

To The Age         You are perfectly entitled to defend "the principle of a free media" ("Media must report without fear", 6/6); and you are right to assert further that a free media has "a public-interest duty to report truthfully, responsibly and without fear or favour." Alas, as one who has read your paper regularly for over sixty years, I have to point out that you do not always live up to that ideal. Two areas of discourse at once come to mind. For some months you appear to have censored out of existence that large body of Australians firmly opposed to any form of "indigenous constitutional recognition" or treaty making with indigenous Australians. The other area is responsible right-wing culture, as manifested both in Australia and overseas. There is a yawning gap in your reporting and commentary. This greatly hinders the conservative cause in our nation. Your progressivist lens has been too narrow.
Yours sincerely,
  Nigel Jackson

Letter to The Editor - We all agree that indigenous Australians have a unique status and role to play in our national future

To The Australian         Julian Lucas is wrong (6/6) in seeing "a treaty between Aborigines and non-Aborigines" as an act unlikely to "provoke legal interference with constitutional rights and duties." That is exactly what it would do. A minority of activists of various kinds, for whatever reasons, is endeavouring to drive a wedge between Aboriginal Australians and the rest of us. Constitutional amendment of any kind and treaty-making of any kind would facilitate their cause of Aboriginal separatism, but be against the interests of Australians as a whole. Moreover, it seems clear that no persons living today can justifiably claim to be of, or to represent, an Aboriginal nation; thus a valid treaty cannot be created. We all agree that indigenous Australians have a unique status and role to play in our national future. We all agree that they deserve special support and encouragement in many contexts. This can be done without crossing the red line towards the division of our continent into two nations.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - Such a division is so obviously against the interests of Australians

To The Age        Is it really true that the Aboriginal flag "has united everybody, all over Australia, from all the Aboriginal nations" ("Aboriginal flag ban shocks businesses", 12/6)? That looks like the kind of wild exaggeration that revolutionaries have been indulging in for centuries. Such doubts are only reinforced by Laura Thompson's further statement that the flag "represented a struggle and a resistance movement." Yes, it is clearly an expression of the campaign for Aboriginal separatism and the division of this continent into two nations. Such a division is so obviously against the interests of Australians generally that it is astounding that so many more Australians do not speak out more clearly in favour of indissoluble national unity in this context.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

Letter to The Editor - Recognising that, they should bow to the clear majority

To The Australian        The UK Environment Secretary Michael Gove may be right ("Boris brushes off opponent's opening salvo", 12/6) that a hard Brexit approach by Boris Johnson (or whoever wins the leadership of the Conservative Party) will be defeated by a vote of no confidence in the Parliament. He should have added that such a vote would be unethical. While it may be that a majority of MPs in the House of Commons are Remainers, they were not elected to Parliament purely on the Brexit issue, but on many others. Recognising that, they should bow to the clear majority for Leave in the 2016 referendum. To do otherwise will continue the corruption of democracy that is happening in the UK.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Letter to The Editor - The PM also needs to back the country away from unnecessary and potentially harmful referendums

To The Australian        Maurice Newman sagely notes that Scott Morrison must "pursue a course more consistent with traditional Liberal Party values" ("Political elites face the wrath", 10/6). He and his colleagues also need a carefully thought out strategy to gradually shift the cultural atmosphere of Australia more to the conservative and traditional side. That is no mean challenge. Newman touches on many of the policies needed: rejection of the "human-induced global warming" scam; protection of Australia's national sovereignty and political independence from the selfish ambitions of elites favouring global governance; and firm protection of our borders with a realistic immigration policy. The PM also needs to back the country away from unnecessary and potentially harmful referendums on a republic and constitutional indigenous recognition.  Most importantly of all, he needs to display humility and graciousness in admitting that he has been wrong to express support for the latter of these two anti-traditional campaigns.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Good News, Good News: The Triumph of Le Pen et al. By Richard Miller

     This news is getting a bit dated now, but it is still good enough for we nationalists to gloat over, that Le Pen has crushed globalist mass immigrationist Macron in the EU election exit poll:
  https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2019/05/26/le-pen-triumphs-over-macron-in-eu-election-exit-poll/
  https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/05/27/exclusive-marine-le-pen-emmanuel-macron-should-definitely-resign-but-he-has-neither-the-honesty-to-do-it-nor-the-panache/

“Populist leader Marine Le Pen and her Rassemblement National (National Rally, or RN) have triumphed over sitting French president Emmanuel Macron in the European Parliament elections, according to exit polls. Ms Le Pen declared victory following exit polls showing the RN winning around 24 per cent of the vote, compared to Macron’s La Republique En Marche! (LREM) who, according to projections, has come in second with 22.5 percent of the vote, French newspaper Le Figaro reports. Declaring victory, the RN leader said, “The trust we have been given by the French in designating us as the first party in France but especially as that of the future alternation is an immense honour.” She went on to call for Macron to dissolve the French parliament, saying “it is up to the President of the Republic to draw the consequences” and calling for fresh elections, stating that Macron put his own presidency on the line in the vote.”

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Letter to the Editor - Perhaps we should regard ourselves as a "free country" in which mutual respect for "the other" is not eroded by fanaticism

To The Age        Chris Pearson asserts that Australia "is a secular country" (3/6). Well, yes and no. Our sovereign is a ruler whose authority is vested in the Christian sacred tradition. In certain respects, therefore, we are a Christian nation. Perhaps the main purpose of the republican movement is to bring that situation to an end. The suggestion that "the Coalition sees its victory as a mandate to allow hate speech" is extreme. More truly, the Coalition has promised protection for those Australians, individuals, groups and institutions, who are religious; and this was made necessary by the ferocious campaign against people of faith waged by a significant number of Australians and more or less supported by the ALP/Greens alliance. Perhaps we should regard ourselves as a "free country" in which mutual respect for "the other" is not eroded by fanaticism, whether religious or secular. At the moment that suggests that added protection is needed for the religious sector rather than the secular sector.
  Nigel Jackson,

 

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Exit the Traitors By Richard Miller

     Another one bites the dust, and it is about time, too, as British Prime Minister Theresa May resigns in girly tears, and exits stage door left, probably to get some well-paying EU job in the great hive. Yes, they didn’t call her “May” for nothing.
  https://www.news.com.au/world/europe/uk-prime-minister-theresa-may-set-to-announce-resignation-after-brexit-failure/news-story/373caf7f7b3475c712364e554fa65cbe

     I found this statesman from Robert Spencer about May, which hits the nail firmly down into the timber:

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Letter to The Editor - The claim that polls show that "more than sixty per cent of Australians back the idea" is questionable

To The Australian        Australians should be wary of the way in which its new government is handling the question of "constitutional" recognition of our so-called "indigenous people" ("Time is right for indigenous voice to be heard in houses of parliament", 28/5). George Williams states that "the Uluru Statement has built considerable momentum". It also has the capacity to fatally divide the political order of this currently unified and united nation.     The claim that polls show that "more than sixty per cent of Australians back the idea" is questionable. Polls are on the nose at the moment. In moving towards a planned referendum on the "voice to Parliament", the PM must ensure that fair publicity and funding is provided for the "no" case.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave

 

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China Loves the Labor Party. Guess Why? By James Reed

     To find out the answer to that question, we need to consult, “Their” ABC:
  https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-19/china-state-media-reaction-to-australian-election-result/11128458

“China's state-owned media outlet Global Times has released an editorial saying it is "far from optimistic again" about Chinese-Australian relations after Prime Minister Scott Morrison's unexpected election win. Key points:

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Letter to The Editor - Anything smacking of racism is anathema

To The New York Times        My fellow countryman Waleed Aly has offered an insightful comment on the recent federal elections result, focusing on what he calls our tendency towards caution rather than any "right-wing" or "hard" conservatism in Australia's soul. What he omitted, however, was any reference to the enormous ideological struggle that has been going on here since the Whitlam (ALP) government took office at the end of 1972. There are those of us who are happy with our historical story of British colonisation, the transition to dominion status after federation and the continuation of our Christian sacred tradition and monarchical constitution. We are pleased to go on as part culturally of the Anglosphere. Many other Australians disagree. They do want big change. Away with the monarchy and the flag and any further hanging on to Britain's coat-tails, they cry! They have much more say in our national forums than do we conservatives. Equality rather than class stratification is their preference. Anything smacking of racism is anathema. The essential message of the very close result in these elections is that this intense struggle between the adherents of two different Australias will continue and that the end result is still in doubt.
  Nigel Jackson, Melbourne, Australia 

 

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Last Minute Interference by Al Gore and the ABC into the Australian Election By Viv Forbes

     The Saltbush Club today called for an enquiry into a last minute intervention by an American politician, Al Gore, into the Australian Election. The Executive Director of the Saltbush Club, Viv Forbes, said that in such a tight election race, the intervention of someone with the international stature of Al Gore, assisted by the climate activist Australian Broadcasting Commission, could easily change the result of the election.

“The Gore intervention was not subtle - he labelled the LNP government climate policy as ‘not credible’ and taking the country ‘in the wrong direction’.

“Becoming even more partisan, Gore praised the opposition Labor plan ‘as an extremely significant act of leadership on the part of Australia.’

“This carefully timed intervention in a closely fought Australian election by a prominent foreign politician is a blatant attempt to promote a damaging climate agenda already rejected in the USA.

“This surely justifies an enquiry into foreign electoral interference and ABC complicity.”

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Letter to the Editor - The Election

     Make sure LNP controls the House of Representatives. Number all squares, put all Greens last and ALP second last. Beware of “Independents” – they may be turncoats like Windsor and Oakshott a while back. Make sure neither ALP/Greens nor LNP control the Senate. Pick sensible minor parties and give them your first vote. Keep numbering until you get to the LNP so your vote does not expire. Put Greens dead last on every ballot paper and ALP just above them. On the Senate keep numbering until you reach the LNP and give no votes to ALP/Greens. The main aim of Saltbush is to change the climate of public opinion. Politicians are driven by public opinion, which drives voting behaviour. So we need to change public opinion. It only needs a couple of percent of people to switch, and politicians will notice, and trim their sails to the new wind.

     We can only do that if we can communicate subversive ideas as widely as possible among opinion leaders, media and the public. In an attempt to change public opinions we have been releasing (every day) statements designed to dramatise and highlight the stupidity of the climate/energy policies or all major parties. Most of them are here:

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Letter to The Editor - The British people would be fools to take this dishonourable behaviour lying down

To The Age        It is good news for the principle of genuine representative government that Nigel Farage's Brexit Party is doing so well in the UK ("Farage tops Tories in British poll", 13/5). First the Conservative Party and then a majority of MPs in the House of Commons have defied the popular wish for Britain to leave the dictatorial European Union, a wish shown clearly in the 2016 referendum verdict. The British people would be fools to take this dishonourable behaviour lying down. Let us hope that Farage is right that "millions of Britons will desert the two main parties" if PM Theresa May and Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn "reach a consensus", because any such agreement would be a betrayal of the majority will and an affront to democracy. It would be a Brexit in name only.

  Nigel Jackson.

 

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Letter to The Editor - The liberals, alas, in a crunch will side with the Left rather than the Right

To The Australian        The latest news from Britain ("Don't cave in to Labour on Brexit, Tories tell May", 7/5) suggests that the actual political struggle going on there now is between those who want a strong betrayal of Brexit and those who want a milder one. The tale has a message for Australia at election time. Just as in the UK, so here, the problem for conservatives is that the main centre-right party is actually fundamentally split between liberals and genuine traditionalists. The liberals, alas, in a crunch will side with the Left rather than the Right - as the Brexit tragedy shows. In both nations too few voters really care for traditional values and the attitudes of responsibility and self-restraint that underpin them. At election time here the best that conservatives can do is direct their primary votes to a right-wing minority party if the mainstream anti-Left candidate is in fact a liberal, not a conservative.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

Authorised by K. W. Grundy
13 Carsten Court, Happy Valley, SA.

Letter to The Editor - Most Australians will not be fooled out of seeing the obvious

To The Australian        If the ALP does win the coming elections, it is to be hoped that common sense will trump fanaticism in the management of Aboriginal affairs ("Dodson under pressure to deliver", 20-21/4). Expectations that "Labor would deliver a first-term referendum on a 'voice to parliament'" will need to be disappointed. All models of "constitutional recognition" involve an innate inequity and capacity to divide, not unify, the nation. Most Australians will not be fooled out of seeing the obvious, so any referendum proposal looks doomed to failure and that is as it should be. Moreover, a failed referendum would see strengthened international pressure put on our government. That also is an ill that should be avoided by common sense and fair play.
  Nigel Jackson, Belgrave, Vic

*Responsibility for electoral comment authorised by K. W. Grundy 13 Carsten Court, Happy Valley, SA.