Letter to The Editor

To the Herald Sun 4/5/17 
Fat cats need a diet 
As Australia's resources fat cats made the billionaires top 100 list again, I was reminded of Alaska which in 1976, nine years after oil was discovered, amended its Constitution to dedicate its yearly oil revenues, in part, to a state investment fund.
Every person since 1982, a permanent fund dividend has been paid to every Alaskan men, woman and child in recognition of the ownership, in part, of its resources.
From a 2008 high of $3269, in more recent years the PFD has been between $1000 and $1500 per person.

Similarly, following Norway's discovery of North Sea oil, Norway created the State Petroleum Fund in 1990. A substantial amount of oil profits, viewed as belonging to all Norwegians, has created a found balance of almost $60 billion. Unlike Alaska, however, always priority is to find community-wide benefits.
Norway has a steady growth rate, almost no poverty, free health, free education (at all levels) and negligible unemployment. Workers enjoy eight weeks paid leave, liberal sick leave, three-year maternity leave and reliable and inexpensive day care. Creative part-time and tell communicating opportunities help keep women in the workforce.
Sadly, I don't see the income from Australia's resources providing the same benefits – it just seems to be making the fat cats fatter.
John Seaton, Prospect Vale, Tas.

Charles Ferguson’s 'The Great News' (1915)

This article stemmed from reading a paper written by an Indian chap on a proposal for a National Dividend for India.  An excellent paper, it has just one small historical error:  from his readings, the chap believed that A.R. Orage coined the term ‘social credit’ which was published in an edition of 'The New Age'. Historically, this was not so, and historical accuracy is important, so this error will be corrected.

But it did send me back to Charles Ferguson’s 'The Great News' (1915).

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Posted on FB by Louis Cook

It is after 3 am and I should be asleep but heard on the radio earlier tonight that the cruise missiles launched against Syria cost the government $US60 million.
This is utter nonsense! What about the cost of two warships put to sea fully crewed with trained personal?

Using chemical weapons against ANYBODY is also to be deplored but was that also ‘false news’ to effect regime change?
I am sorry to suggest that Donald Trump appears no different to predecessors Obama, Bush, and those other twerps, Brown, Blair and David ‘what’s his name’?
The Australian Prime Minister also supports these ‘war-mongers’.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR by Ralph Provan

‘Unbelievable’’ best describes Australia’s domestic electricity and gas supply shortages in one of the richest resource-endowed countries on the planet. How has this been allowed to happen?
This downhill slide to tragic shortages, unreliability, plus ever-increasing costs has occurred after privatisation of our state and Commonwealth-owned essential services.
Electricity, water, rail, Telstra, air and sea ports — all of which provided service reliability to Australians while at the same time planning for expansion of these same services — have been sold off.

The philosophy of privatisation of public assets — paid for in our rates and taxes by all Australians — to transnational corporations, overseas banks and foreign governments smells like treason.
These examples beg the question: Who do our party MPs actually represent?
Parliaments state and federal appear to be expensive puppet shows with the strings being pulled by transnational corporations, international bankers, including the Macquarie Bank, and foreign governments.

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Pop goes the Property Market by James Reed

The governor of the Reserve Bank has warned that the debt-mad property market in Sydney and Melbourne, which is the bulk of Australia, is about to face big problems. (The Australian, April 5, 2017, p. 1) First, banks are lending to people who have no hope of repaying their debts. Second, because of this, household debts are rising more than twice as fast as household income.

A repeat of the 1890s great property collapse, caused by a housing land boom could soon be repeated, where half of all banks closed. One segment of the financial elite class has poo-pooed all of this, saying that it has a low probability of happening. I would like to know who gives them their probabilities. Anyway, even if this was so, the consequences will be catastrophic for protected little Australia. We are only just getting the unhappy scenario of people living in cars and under bridges common in Europe and the United States.

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Le Pen on the Four Sovereignties by James Reed

French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen has vowed to “destroy the New World Order” when she is elected President of France, warning the European elites that she will “dismantle their corrupt, self-serving institutions with my own two hands if I have to.”
See: http://yournewswire.com/marine-le-pen-destroy-new-world-order/.

“The people have spoken and their message is clear: the New World Order is finished,” Marine Le Pen said.
“The elite are not safe hiding behind their propaganda fuelled media institutions, making unaccountable decisions in Brussels, and silencing citizens who speak out against this insanity. When I am President a tidal wave of revulsion will be coming their way, the likes of which has never been seen before.”

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Paul Keating says neo-liberalism is at 'a dead end' after Sally McManus speech

Ref: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/paul-keating-says-neoliberalism-is-at-a-dead-end-after-sally-mcmanus-speech-20170329-gv9cto

Former prime minister Paul Keating - architect of some of the most profound economic reforms in the country's history during the 1980s - has launched a surprise critique of the liberal economic philosophy he once championed, declaring it has "run into a dead end"...
Mr Keating made his remarks in response to a speech delivered by the new leader of the ACTU, Sally McManus, at the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday...Mr Keating's response will surprise many who have seen him as a hitherto staunch defender of open markets, and key force in modernising the Australian economy. He also presided over some of the federal government's earliest privatisations and the floating of the dollar.
His shift in rhetoric will be grist to union attacks on the government and the business community over growing job insecurity and flat-lining wages...

Katter calls for minor parties to come together and don’t forget the Culleton factor

Ref: https://cairnsnews.org/2017/03/13/one-nation-wa-election-fall-out/
KAP Member for Kennedy, Bob Katter watched Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Party’s performance in the Western Australia (WA) election closely. It is Mr Katter’s little party, the KAP – who stand to gain or lose the most from One Nation’s performance in the looming Qld election.

Mr Katter said, “Anyone in Qld who thinks One Nation is dead in the water is badly misreading the situation. The LNP is toxic in WA, but the difference in Qld is, so is the ALP (as well as the LNP).
“The disaster of One Nation giving all their preferences to Liberals, and voting with them all the time in Canberra… (This brought down Tony Windsor who was always voting with the ALP), One Nation is beginning to look like a LNP lamb in wolf’s ‘Third Force’ clothing, the Hanson Party must realise the reason people vote for them is because they’re not one of the majors.

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The Rise of the Machines by Brain Simpson

Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) accelerate, with a new tool  allowing AI to learn to do almost anything on a computer, learning to use Apps like humans do: https://www.wired.com/2016/12/openais-universe-computers-learn-to-use-apps-like-humans/.
Open AI, the Ai lab backed by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, has released “Universe,” a virtual world for AI to learn, which covers any software, everything that a human can do with a computer. Universe is thus a software platform, software for running other software, and in principle this will lead to AI being able to solve any problem, better than humans can do. This is early days yet, but that was so with facial and digital image representation previously.

A recent article in The Australian: “Future Shock: What Happens When Robots Take Our Jobs” (January 17, 2017, p. 9) discusses the idea of a universal income scheme for dealing with the “end of work” problem. A side bar discussion notes that India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, after scrapping two high-value bank notes which account for 86 percent of India’s currency by value, now wants to introduce a universal basic income which directly gives cash to India’s poorest. His goal is, apparently, to control corruption in India.
India, after Russia, is the world’s second most unequal country, where the top 1 percent own 60 percent of the wealth.

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"The Delusion of Super-Production" - C. H. Douglas. English Review, December, 1918

It is hardly necessary to draw attention to the insistence with which we are told that in order to pay for the war we must produce more manufactured goods than ever before--a powerful section of the Press would have the whole military, political, social and industrial policy of the Allied Governments directed to the purpose, that, when by a complete victory we have acquired control of raw material and disposed of our most dangerous competitor, we may adjust our internal differences and settle down to an unfettered era of commercial activity, from which all other desirable things will, it is suggested, proceed naturally.

There are an almost infinite number of aspects to this proposition which is not dissimilar, so far as it goes, from that with which Germany went to war: it is possible to attack it from the point of view of the historian, the psychologist, or even the physiologist. It is even possible that certain quite indispensable suffrages have still to be obtained for it. But it is sufficiently interesting to take it as it stands on a frankly material, "practical" basis, and see what are its logical consequences.

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The Triumph of Trump by Chris Knight

President Donald J. Trump’s inauguration speech was magnificent. He basically said that the power mad Washington DC elites had rule like tyrants for too long, and now it ends. It was a speech that brought tears to any patriot’s eye. Bill Clinton, on the stage with the rest of the folk Trump was attacking was looking with lust at Trump’s daughter Ivanka (you can see it on YouTube), and Obama looked like he had been kicked in the guts. He had.

There seems to be even a slight awareness that a profound revolution against globalist ideology is occurring. Here are some interesting words from someone who needs no introduction to this site,  Greg Sheridan, The Australian’s foreign editor, “Trump’s Triumph Explained: Xi and Obama Fuel America’s Revolt,” The Australian, January 19, 2017, p. 1.
“Two presidents, China’s Xi Jinping and America’s Barack Obama, have taken actions which do much to explain why Donald Trump is triumphant.
Xi Jinping, at the World Economic Forum at Davos no less, posed as the champion of globalisation, even preaching against protectionism and populism.
“Just blaming economic globalisation for the world’s problems is inconsistent with reality, and will not help solve them,” he said.
You have to admire Xi’s chutzpah. If every nation in the world practised globalisation in the way the Chinese government does, it would be a world of constant chaos and near inevitable conflict.

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The Globalist War Against Cash, the Internet and Freedom by Richard Miller

In India millions of people are already in revolt against new anti-cash laws which has led to hundreds of millions of poor people being unable to access their savings:
http://yournewswire.com/india-millions-protest-new-world-order-ban-cash/

The global financial elites want to eliminate cash as this will give them even more control over the ordinary people, and India is being used as a test-run for what is planned across the world. Without cash the New World Order overlords can readily control what one buys and what one does.
The Australian government, following calls from multinational finance companies, is examining abolishing the Australian hundred-dollar note, done under the guise of reducing the “black market economy”:
http://catallaxyfiles.com/2016/12117/cross-post-john-adams-we-must-resist-the-war-on-cash/
As Mike Adams points out, the attack on cash is part of a globalist offensive on freedom, including freedom of the internet (Natural News.com, December 5, 2016) There is already censorship of the social media in German:
http://collapse.news/2016-12-05-german-governments-fear-of-hate-speech-leading-to-full-throttle-censorship-on-facebook.html

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The Costs of Foreign Domination of Australian Agriculture by James Reed

The  ATOs Corporate Tax Transparency List for 2014-2015, has revealed the ugly truth that dozens of foreign multinational companies that have made billions buying and selling Australian agricultural commodities have paid no tax: http://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/news/national/foreign-agriculture-giants-avoid-australian-tax-bill/news-story/6f30e64fa8b270a13c6c3e2bd27c57b0. Apparently these multinationals all made losses, some for the second year in a row. The companies span the entire Australian agricultural sector of grain, wool, dairy, wine, pork and other commodities.
If such companies make losses then why are they still operating here? Clearly we Australians, due to our absurdly biased tax laws, written to benefit the multinationals over locals, are being taken once again down the river. Wake up Australia!

The Neocon’s declaration of war against Trump by The Saker

Ref: http://thesaker.is/the-neocons-declaration-of-war-against-trump/
After several rather lame false starts, the Neocons have now taken a step which can only be called a declaration of war against Donald Trump.

It all began with CNN published an article entitled “Intel chiefs presented Trump with claims of Russian efforts to compromise him” which claimed that:

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Social Credit Solutions by M. Oliver Heydorn Ph.D.

Social Credit

"It is of crucial importance that any monetary reform decentralize power over policy rather than centralize it even further in the hands of an elite few; the easiest and most effective way of achieving that decentralization is to enfranchise the individual citizens as the ultimate beneficiaries of any change in the economy’s financial infrastructure. Indeed, this is the whole aim of the Social Credit reforms."

The Social Credit economic model maintains that the most urgent economic reform, the one that goes to the very heart of our tangled web of economic problems and perennial dissatisfactions, is the need to re-engineer the economy’s financial infrastructure. Changing the financial system along the lines that Social Credit indicates is not only necessary for a substantial improvement in our economic affairs, it may also prove to be sufficient for significantly reducing, if not eliminating entirely, most of the chronic symptoms of dysfunction with which we are familiar. I am thinking here of various distinct but intimately interconnected phenomena such as: poverty in the midst of plenty, servility in place of leisure, economic instability, inflation, and heavy taxation, ever-increasing and unrepayable debts, waste, inefficiency, and economic sabotage in all its forms, forced economic growth, the centralization of wealth, power and privilege, social breakdown, environmental damage, and international economic warfare leading to military war.

The specific re-engineering of the financial system that is at issue here is no arbitrary or doctrinaire alteration, but is firmly grounded on the principle that the financial system, like any system of weights and measures worth its salt, should at all times provide a symbolic representation of the physical economy that scrupulously corresponds to the actual reality. This is a functional necessity. If the money system is to adequately fulfill its purpose, the purpose for which it was invented, it must be an honest system; that is, it must provide an accurate reflection, an accurate picture, of all of the relevant physical economic facts.1

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Economists' failed professionalism by Robert Klinck


This video is about how orthodox economic theory (an outgrowth of Puritanism) misinterprets and distorts reality and how for decades proposals for rectification have been systematically ignored and suppressed.

Dividends Instead of Debts by M. Oliver Heydorn

Ref: http://www.socred.org/index.php/blogs/view/dividends-instead-of-debts
Just last week, Equifax Canada, a credit reporting agency, revealed that the total outstanding consumer debt in Canada had increased 3.6% over the course of a one-year period. At the end of September 2015, Canadian consumers owed 1.587 trillion dollars in debt. By the end of September 2016, that number had risen to 1.702 trillion dollars. Cf. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/household-finances/more-canadians-going-bust-as-consumer-debt-surges-36/article33235495/. The increase of 3.6%, while sounding small, actually involved a net increase in outstanding debt of 115 billion dollars. Please note that we are NOT told how much consumer debt was written off as bad debt during the same period. If that debt had not been wiped out, the total amount owing would undoubtedly have been even greater.

The steady increase in outstanding consumer debt occurs because there is insufficient consumer income to purchase all that is on offer in the economy. Relatively lower interest rates merely facilitate the increase; it is not its fundamental cause as the article seems to suggest. When people do not have sufficient money to purchase the goods and services that are available and that answer to some need or want, they can nevertheless obtain the goods if they are able and willing to pledge their future incomes as collateral for additional credit in the present. It must be stressed that this credit, which is obtained from private banks in the form of lines of credit, personal loans, credit cards, mortgages, student loans, car loans, installment buying programmes, etc., is, like the bulk of the money supply, created out of nothing in the form of intangible numbers and issued as an interest-bearing debt. Consumers who borrow are not borrowing from the rich with the bank acting as an intermediary; they are borrowing the money into existence directly from the bank as a money-creating agency. Consumer credit therefore represents an injection of new or additional money for the economy, money the economy desperately needs if it is to stave off recession or worse.

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The Rise of the Machines, Fanboy Club by Brian Simpson

Matt Ridley is one of those “no limits” kind of guys, and it is not surprising to see his article welcoming the rise of the robots: “Let’s Stop Being So Paranoid about the Rise of the Androids,” The Australian, November 22, 2016, p. 10. The problem is that both low skilled and high skilled jobs are at risk. If “thinking machines” can be created, even those with a good approximation to human capacities, regardless of philosophical problems about the nature of consciousness, the thinking jobs will go too. The computer geeks like to think that they are safe: someone has to look after the “thinking machines,” but even they are delusional because ultimately a robot floating in algorithms, could do that.

Ridley says that in the past automation of work led to more jobs, not less. The pessimists are just wrong. And if they are right, well, then its the time to consider a basic income, a salary from the government. Dream on. The mainstream media are simply not dealing with this issue with the seriousness it deserves. This time, it is really different.
Fortunately, this site has a lively social credit response to the “end of work” problem, and well recommended for reading is http://www.alor.org/NewTimes%20Survey/A%20Carbon%20Currency%20Future.htm

The Workless Future by James Reed

The social credit writers of the League have been producing some very good work on dealing with the issue of the 'end of work'. Here I simply want to mention that I am seeing more material published on this in the mainstream press, which is no doubt a testing ground for what is to come.
There have been reviews of a new book on this topic by Tim Dunlop, Why the Future is Workless, (New South, 2016). Neo-liberalism combined with robotics has created a new class of people, the “precariat,” to use economist Guy Standing’s term. These people have uncertain part-time or short-term work, and consequently an uncertain future. And the class of the precariat will grow, with Oxford University researchers predicting that 47 percent of existing jobs will disappear in the next 20 years.
As an example, just around the corner, 3D printers might “print” out an entire house!

To deal with this social challenge there will need to be fundamental changes and Dunlop is sympathetic to the idea of a universal basic income. There is no mention of social credit, and the limitations of the basic income scheme have been discussed at this site.
One of the things following from the robotics revolution, ironically enough, is the end of globalism, or at least in part. Jamie Walker, “Robots Help Bring Jobs Back Home,” The Weekend Australian, November 19-20, 2016, p. 15, points out that both cheap energy and robotics will result in more reshoring because robots are cheaper than overseas workers. There will not be, though, many new jobs created, and those that are, will be essentially in getting the intelligent machines to work, if they are lucky, before even they are replaced.
Thus, we can indeed take it that work as we know it has come to an end and any discussion and future planning should proceed from that point.

The War on Cash by James Reed

Here is a worrying sign from India, reported by Brian Maher at http://dailyreckoning.com/author/bmaher, November 17, 2016.
In India 90 percent of all transactions are by cash. But the government, in a plan so secret that even India’s financial institutions were unprepared, suddenly banned its 500-rupee and 1,000-rupee bills, worth $US 7.50 and $US 15 respectively. This led to poor people having to go back to barter, if they could.
This shows that governments could outlaw cash overnight, even in Australia. However, willing members of the legal profession could immediately initiate action in our High Court of Australia to pull the federal government back to order using our constitution as the supreme law of the land.

From Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_51(xii)_of_the_Constitution_of_Australia

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All Blog Posts Authorised by K. W. Grundy
13 Carsten Court, Happy Valley, SA.