The Denmark Farming Emissions Tax, By Richard Miller (London)

 Here is the latest test case in the climate change alarmist war against farming. Denmark is set to tax farmers for greenhouse gas emissions from their livestock, particular targeting cows, pigs, and sheep regarding methane emissions. The tax will commence in the globalist big year of 2030, the year of Agenda 2030, and will involve atax of 300 kroner (approximately $43) per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent. This will increase to 750 kroner ($108) by 2035. The money will go towards Green projects and other nonsense.

The real agenda here is not greenhouse gas emissions, or else things like free trade and consumerism and planned obsolescence itself would be under focus, but to destroy small farmers and concentrate what remains of farming in the hands of the big corporations. Catherine Austin Fitts, founder and president of the Solari Report, said, "Emissions are a cover story to achieve steps in the central bankers' 'Going Direct Reset.'" The goal of this "reset" is "to consolidate control over the food supply, shifting to corporate-controlled 'Pharma Food' and to shift energy availability from the general population to feed an electrical control grid that will supply AI [artificial intelligence], robotics, digital IDs and an all-digital financial system."

"We are trading fresh food and freedom for digital concentration camps and lab-grown meat," Fitts said. "On Wall Street, we used to call this 'a bad trade.'"

This "bad trade" will be coming across the West unless it too is fought and defeated.

https://childrenshealthdefense.org/defender/denmark-tax-livestock-emissions-small-farmers/?utm_source=luminate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=defender&utm_id=20240709

"Denmark is set to become the first country in the world to tax farmers for the greenhouse gasses emitted by their livestock, in a deal reached June 24 between the Danish government and representatives of the farming industry and unions.

The tax, which specifically targets methane emissions by cows, pigs and sheep, will take effect in 2030, pending final approval by the Danish Parliament, The Associated Press (AP) reported.

Beginning in 2030, farmers will be required to pay a tax of 300 kroner (approximately $43) per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent. This will increase to 750 kroner ($108) by 2035. After a 60% tax deduction, the respective amounts will be 120 kroner ($17.30) and 300 kroner.

CNN, quoting Denmark's "green think tank" Concito, reported that Danish dairy cows emit, on average, 5.6 tonnes (6.2 U.S. tons) of CO2-equivalent emissions per year. This would result in a tax of 672 kroner per cow ($96) in 2030 and 1,680 kroner ($241) in 2035.

The respective emissions figure for all Danish cows is an average of 6.6 tons of CO2-equivalent annually, according to the AP, which reported that the Danish government aims to reduce the country's greenhouse emissions by 70% from 1990 levels by 2030, citing Taxation Minister Jeppe Bruus.

According to CNN, the proceeds from the tax will be used to support the agricultural industry's green transition in the first two years, including the investment of 40 billion kroner ($3.7 billion) for measures including reforestation and establishing wetlands.

After two years, the tax will be "reassessed."

Denmark is a significant exporter of pork and dairy products, CNN reported. Agriculture is the country's largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. The AP reported that, as of June 2022, there were nearly 1.5 million cows in Denmark.

Tax will encourage farmers 'to look for solutions to reduce emissions'

Proponents of the tax emphasized that Denmark is the first country to enact such a policy, characterizing it as a step toward greater environmental sustainability.

"We will take a big step closer in becoming climate neutral in 2045," Bruus said.

"We are investing billions in the biggest transformation of the Danish landscape in recent times," said Danish Foreign Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen in a statement quoted by CNN. "At the same time, we will be the first country in the world with a (carbon) tax on agriculture."

According to Torsten Hasforth, Concito's chief economist, "The whole purpose of the tax is to get the sector to look for solutions to reduce emissions," CNN reported. Hasforth noted that farmers could, for instance, change the feed they use, as part of their efforts to reduce emissions.

The Danish Society for Nature Conservation called the tax "a historic compromise," in remarks quoted by the AP. The organization's president, Maria Reumert Gjerding, said, "We have succeeded in landing a compromise on a CO2 tax, which lays the groundwork for a restructured food industry — also on the other side of 2030."

And Ben Lilliston, director of Rural Strategies and Climate Change at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, told PBS NewsHour that methane emissions are "a huge problem … a huge challenge." He argued that while methane remains in the atmosphere for fewer years than CO2, it has "about 80 times the potency."

"If you reduce methane, you can get more near-term results and allow us to have a little longer of a window to reduce carbon dioxide emission," Lilliston said.

Carbon tax on farmers a 'scary experiment'

Denmark's carbon tax was enacted despite recent farmers' protests throughout Europe, including large protests in Brussels, the de facto capital of the European Union (EU) and center of EU policymaking.

The farmers voiced grievances over new environmental regulations and the corporate takeover of European farming.

In recent years, EU member states such as Ireland and the Netherlands have also pursued plans to limit farming and cull livestock, leading to protests in those countries.

New Zealand planned to enact a carbon tax, set to take effect in 2025. The tax, passed by the country's previous center-left government, was repealed last month by New Zealand's new center-right governing coalition, according to the AP.

Criticisms are now being levied against Denmark's new carbon tax, with some experts arguing that it amounts to an added burden for the agricultural sector — particularly small farmers.

CNN quoted Danish farmers' association Bæredygtigt Landbrug, which described the new policy as a "scary experiment."

Peder Tuborgh, CEO of Arla Foods, Europe's largest dairy company, told CNN that the new tax is "positive," but farmers who "genuinely do everything they can to reduce emissions" should be exempt.

In remarks shared with The Defender, Catherine Austin Fitts, founder and president of the Solari Report, said, "Emissions are a cover story to achieve steps in the central bankers' 'Going Direct Reset.'"

According to Fitts, the goal of this "reset" is "to consolidate control over the food supply, shifting to corporate-controlled 'PharmaFood' and to shift energy availability from the general population to feed an electrical control grid that will supply AI [artificial intelligence], robotics, digital IDs and an all-digital financial system."

"We are trading fresh food and freedom for digital concentration camps and lab-grown meat," Fitts said. "On Wall Street, we used to call this 'a bad trade.'"

Other critics told The Defender the Danish government's new tax has less to do with protecting the environment and reducing emissions, and more to do with achieving the United Nations' (U.N.) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the objectives of global entities such as the G20 and the World Economic Forum (WEF).

Dutch attorney and activist Meike Terhorst told The Defender:

"I think the measures have nothing to do with sustainability but with power. A group of companies, the so-called globalists/banks/investors, such as the WEF, work together with governments, such as the G20, and together they can force the small farmers off their lands."

Tim Hinchliffe, editor of The Sociable, said small farms will bear the brunt of the new tax.

"Small farmers will be the first to go, and their land will most likely be used to house a variety of so-called 'green initiatives,' such as fake meat labs, acres of solar panels and wind turbines as far as the eye can see, new AI data centers that require tons of water, energy and land, and possibly even nuclear power plants to power those data centers," he said.

Similarly, Terhorst said the goal is to "close down the small farmers as part of the 'Agenda 2030' — U.N. SDGs — or the corporate takeover agenda."

Terhorst said this agenda aims "to ensure that small farmers are to be removed from the land and replaced by 'digital' farming" — meaning "replacing meat and milk with factory-made insect food or milk and lab-grown meat."

Critics also questioned claims that policies like carbon taxation help promote "sustainability."

"When unelected globalists at the WEF and the U.N. talk about sustainability, they don't mean self-sustainability for the individual. They don't want that at all. They want to ensure sustainable control, influence and power for themselves for decades to come," Hinchliffe said, adding:

"As I see it, the real goal here is to take control of prime agricultural land and to tax farmers out of existence. Once the taxes get too expensive and the farmers can't keep up, that's when public-private entities swoop in to take control of the land.

"If they really believed that flatulent farm animals were responsible for the weather, they would just plant more trees to absorb the carbon, and their imaginary crisis would be solved, but they're not doing that because what they're really after are land grabs, money, and total control of our food systems."

According to Hinchliffe, global organizations also aim to change human habits — including meat consumption. He said:

"On a nutritional level, groups like the WEF and the U.N. want us eating less meat and more bugs, and this will only make us weaker and more docile as a species over time.

"It also makes us all dependent on very centralized sources of protein, so if there's an outbreak or a contamination, citizens all over the world will suffer because there'll be no alternative. The local farmers will have disappeared due to the carbon taxes and land grabs."

"The bio meat industry was organized and financed by the investors and banks that are part of the WEF," Terhorst said. "If we want to become sustainable, we have to limit the powers of the investors and WEF and support small farmers."

Hinchliffe added, "When carbon taxes fail to quash the human spirit completely, they already have plans to tax just about everything else in nature, including the air we breathe, the water we drink and the very soil upon which we walk.""

 

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Friday, 19 July 2024

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