Why Should I Care if All the Insects Die? By James Reed

     Suffering form conservation/diversity overload, news of the insects dying out, just bores me, when Northern Europeans are set to die out, in the Great Replacement. Why, I am dying out now, too poor to even get my teeth fixed, swallowing cheap painkillers all day.  Should I really care what survives? OK, there will be famine from lack of plant fertilisation, disruption to the ecosystems and other roll-on effects, if we can believe the so-called science, but since much of it comes from the UN and globalists, I am honour bound to reject the claims without reading them, just as our claims are ignored.
  https://www.dw.com/en/insect-apocalypse-dying-ecosystem-species-loss-a-52160360/a-52160360

“Conservationists say fears of an insect apocalypse, Armageddon and absolute extinction are overblown, but acting now could save populations that are plummeting. Seven 'no-regret' actions could rescue insects on the road to extinction, a new roadmap for conservation says, helping ecosystems even where a lack of research means scientists cannot prove benefits to individual species. Earth's biodiversity is declining at unprecedented rates but population data on insects — which are small, diverse and abundant — is patchy. Instead of waiting to fill knowledge gaps, 75 experts writing in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution are calling for immediate actions that also improve ecosystems and wider society. Short-term measures such as phasing out pesticides and diversifying farmland could set struggling insect species on a path to recovery while better data is collected. "We reap what we sow," said Jeff Harvey, ecologist at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and lead author of the roadmap. "It's a no-brainer that decline of insects will affect other species in the food chain… We can't just put little bandages on this." 'Insectageddon' Last year, a global review published in the journal Biological Conservation spawned headlines heralding an "insect apocalypse," "Armageddon" and "collapse of nature" when it found 40% of insect species would face the threat of extinction within decades.”

     Even if these claims of an insect apocalypse are exaggerated, something environmentalist do all the time for dramatic media impact, measures such as phasing out pesticides and diversifying farmland are good for humans, regardless of how we feel about the little creepy crawlies. Oh, the bugs that fly, like bees, are important too, but every time I am around one, it decides that stinging me is worth dying for. I don’t like them, and the feeling is mutual.

 

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Tuesday, 22 September 2020
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