By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://blog.alor.org/

What Japan Should do with the Fukushima Waste By James Reed

     Japan at present is very generous in pumping nuclear waste from the Fukushima power station into the public commons of the ocean. We will all thank them for turning us into Marvel superheroes in the future, but in the meantime, surely there are better ways of using this valuable resource? How about canning it, maybe in ultra-thick lead cans, and making some sort of soda pop out of it, with photos of pretty anime girls all over the lead can?
  https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/japan-nuclear-waste-fukushima-power-station-tsunami-water-sea-olympics-a9312246.html?utm_source=reddit.com?utm_source=amerika.org

“Massive amounts of radioactive water being stored at Japan’s Fukushima power plant could be released into the sea under plans provisionally accepted by the country’s government. Tokyo Electric has collected nearly 1.2 million tonnes of contaminated water from cooling pipes used to keep fuel cores from melting since the plant was devastated by the earthquake and tsunami which hit eastern Japan in 2011. The water, containing 62 radioactive elements, is stored in huge tanks on the site of the now disabled power plant, but Tokyo Electric has said it will run out of room to store the water by 2022. The water has been treated and Tokyo Electric said it is able to remove all radioactive particles from the water to levels not harmful to humans, except tritium, an isotope of hydrogen which is more difficult to separate from water. A panel of experts working for Japan’s economy and industry ministry concluded that letting the water run into the sea was the best option after looking at other proposals. The only other viable option considered was to let the water evaporate.”

     I gather that the hard-to-remove radioactive tritium will add extra flavour to anything it comes in contact with, such as marine life, and fish. Soon we may even be able to purchase glow-in-the-dark fish meals in a tin from Asia, where most of our tin fish now comes from.

 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Tuesday, 26 May 2020
If you'd like to register, please fill in the username, password and name fields.