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Tidal Power In The Shetlands by Paul Homewood

http://renews.biz/101854/first-power-at-shetland-tidal-array/

A Scottish energy company’s tidal turbine system has become the first in the world to deliver electricity to the national grid.
Nova Innovation said its Shetland Isles project marks a big step forward in using tidal energy as a reliable source of renewable power.
The firm installed its first turbine in the Bluemull Sound earlier this year, with the device generating to full power across all tidal conditions.
A second turbine was installed this month to work alongside the first.

The company’s eventual goal is to have large number of turbines connected in an "array".
Simon Forrest, managing director of Nova Innovation said:
"We are absolutely delighted to be the first company in the world to deploy a fully operational tidal array."
He added: "Deploying the second turbine truly sets us apart and showcases our technology.
"I would like to thank all our staff, partners and suppliers for helping to make our vision a reality."

Jenny Hogan, director of policy at Scottish Renewables, said: "Scotland is already at the forefront of capturing power from the tides and waves, and Nova’s latest news demonstrates that lead is well-deserved.
"The country is already home to some of the most advanced marine energy technologies anywhere, as well as the European Marine Energy Centre – arguably the most advanced marine energy proving site in the world.
"With companies like Nova and others all working on developing this cutting-edge technology, the sector holds huge promise for the future."
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/tidal-turbine-system-first-deliver-power-national-grid-122300705.html
 
According to Nova, this is the second in a series of five 100KW turbines. They are likely to generate at about 25% of capacity, giving about 1GWh a year, or enough to power approximately 270 homes.
The renewable energy website, Renews, tells us that £3.75 million scheme has received £1.9 million of public funding from Scottish Enterprise, which seems an awful lot of money for such a small amount of power.
Even then, it is not clear how the cost of the scheme can be recovered without further subsidies. 

 

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Tuesday, 14 July 2020
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