Planet X; Does it Exist? By Brian Simpson

     For the many hundreds of  readers who, like me are fascinated by astrophysics and astronomy, today we look at Planet X. Well, not exactly look at it literally, because nobody knows whether or not it exists: it is hypothesised to exist to explain various anomalies:
  https://www.inquisitr.com/5054850/if-planet-nine-really-is-out-there-it-may-be-invisible-to-our-telescopes/
  https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/hypothetical-planet-x/in-depth/

“Although the evidence to support the existence of Planet Nine has only been circumstantial so far, astronomers continue the search for this mysterious world hypothetically lurking in the outer regions of the solar system.
Thought to hide out somewhere beyond the orbit of Neptune and the Kuiper belt, the elusive Planet Nine was first theorized in 2016 by Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown, two planetary astrophysicists with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). As reported by The Inquisitr, Batygin and Brown proposed that this enigmatic planet, known as the “missing super-Earth,” is the reason behind the peculiar orbit of a handful of small objects in the Kuiper belt, which exhibit a bizarre tilt in relation to the plane of the solar system.”

     It is going to be difficult to detect such a planet so far away with Earth telescopes, but maybe the Hubble space telescope, or something following it, may ultimately lend a hand. Note that the existence of Planet X beyond Pluto, has nothing to do with the internet scenario of the Nibiru cataclysm, where a giant wacking planet will at some point smack into the Earth. No doubt, if this happens, we will all know about it, for a few seconds. It will not be a good day, but will be “good night.”

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