Locking Away Your Guns, and Throwing Away the Key to Your Freedom By John Steele

     Good people of Australia, you have excelled yourself in this one, by doing nothing, so that evil triumphs once more. What have our independents done about this one? 
I have in mind the changes across the country to firearms laws. Under the guise of making the community safer from guns, even though the country is awash with ILLEGAL guns brought into Australia by ethnic crime gangs, who basically rule the streets now:  http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/government-toughens-gun-laws-in-response-to-shootings-and-gangs-arms-race-20151027-gkk18x.html. The Authorities have lost control of this, and in any case have no ability to control it since organised crime now shades into the government, as it does throughout Asia:
http://theconversation.com/why-the-calabrian-mafia-in-australia-is-so-little-recognised-and-understood-50914;
http://www.smh.com.au/national/from-armenia-to-australia-how-the-mob-controls-the-trafficking-of-ice-into-australia-20160318-gnlwal.html;
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/inquirer/calabrian-mafia-stretches-across-australia-from-murder-to-ecstasy/news-story/a784fdfd62b050eb928092b663918a6b.

     To give the illusion that something is being done, the government likes to crack down on law-abiding, primarily Anglo-Australians. The game plan since Howard’s gun grab in 1996: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuoBItG5FMU; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMjBhI3NhiY; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5vplwjX-Zo, has been to disarm the lawful citizens while doing nothing real about organised crime, because that would be contrary to globalism and multiculturalism.

     There are new requirements for securing firearms, which are the thin edge of the wedge, designed to completely eliminate firearms ownership by private citizens.
 First, there is a requirement to justify having a firearm in the first place, and self-defence does not count! That’s right, it is not a valid reason for having a gun, to wish to defend yourself. Thus, a lone woman in a rural property, miles from the police, faced with a pack of rapists, just gets raped! That is the “logical” conclusion of that law.
The gun banners always say: “if under threat, ring the police.” But, the police have no legal duty to defend you, in the sense that if the woman did make the police call and the police failed to prevent the gang rape, she would not be able to sue the police. Yet we have these absurd laws making people prey to gangs. This does occur, rather frequently in the city, and there are some horror attacks on women by armed gangs, including this shocker where a pregnant woman was attacked by a gang armed with a claw hammers, a baseball bat and an axe: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-16/pregnant-woman-hit-with-hammer-during-robbery-at-noble-park/7850874.

     Here is a more recent hammer attack on a lone women, this time involving six men, who beat the woman with their hammers, smashed her home and left with stolen property: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-27/adelaide-woman-hurt-after-hammer-attack-six-men-balaclavas/8388612.

     It is possible to compose a lengthy article of further internet news items showing how vulnerable people, such as women and older Australians, are being victimised by gangs, especially here in Melbourne. In all cases, there is no option for ringing the police for help as the crime takes place too quickly. Worse, even when people fight back against gangs, the police may try and go after what we would consider the victim. I have mentioned this case before, but I think it is an all-time classic, showing how insane Australia’s self-defence laws are, or at least, how police interpret them: http://blogs.brisbanetimes.com.au/bluntinstrument/archives/2008/08/hero_is_word_ov.html?page=fullpage.

     A Sydney father, Dion Driman, had his home invaded by a gang of 30 youths. After being beaten up by them, he armed himself with a sjambok, a South African whip, probably the plastic version made by Cold Steel, and defended himself. At the time, the police were seeking to charge the father for use of excessive force. Here is a quote from the Sydney Morning Herald, just so you don’t think I am making this up:


 “None of the youths could be identified and so no charges were laid. Hornsby police were called to the incident and are understood to be considering whether the force Mr Driman used to protect his home was excessive.
NSW Police could not comment on the incident yesterday but a spokesman told the local paper Mr Driman had the right to defend himself - the question was whether he had used too much force.
“All I would suggest, if a situation arises again, leave it to the police to handle,” he said.
Mr Driman remained unrepentant: “I would gladly do it again. They picked on the wrong guy,” he said.”

     The police “logic” here is that the father should have been beaten to death, rather than defend himself, because the police could not have got to his home in minutes. Secondly, one man was facing a virtual army of thugs, so how could he defend himself, unarmed? And, this is not an isolated incident, because the authorities were deeply concerned that nurses who had to cross a dark and dangerous park, at night, a haven for rapists, were arming themselves with weapons of mass destruction such a scissors:
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/nurses-fear-attacks-under-restrictive-adelaide-oval-parking-system/news-story/66fcb3e94cfda283eee1e621b1de33b1;
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/messenger/north-northeast/womens-and-childrens-hospital-staff-get-more-parking-options-following-128-space-permit-parking-system-deal-with-adelaide-city-council/news-story/6c9a1a620f095bab7c53fa07372c28f5;
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/adelaide-women-take-action-against-male-predators-are-series-of-sex-attacks/news-story/7e532c800937dbf62c3504ec72940f2a.

     It is in this context of depriving people of their natural right to self-defence, that the new firearms storage restrictions must be viewed. The regulations are complicated, but here is a cut ‘n’ paste from the South Australian legislation, which the SA editor kindly emailed to me, having limited internet access here in the scrub country. The following extract is from the South Australian Firearms Regulations 2017, Schedule 1, section 11. This will be a long and hard to follow piece of legal prose, so if you have trouble, just flip ahead. Basically, what is put in place here is comprehensive security arrangements. A specific gun safe will be needed for all firearms, but a CCTV and security system will be required for residents having over 20 firearms, with further qualifications if there are any pistols or category firearms other than A and B:


“11—Storage and security of firearms other than paint-ball firearms

(1) This clause— (a) does not apply to, or in respect of, paint-ball firearms; and (b) does not apply to a licensed dealer who has possession of a firearm in the ordinary course of the business of dealing in firearms; and (c) does not apply to a person who has possession of a firearm in the ordinary course of the business of storing goods; and (d) does not derogate from, and applies subject to, the conditions of a firearms licence or permit held by a person.

(2) For the purposes of this clause, the total number of firearms taken to be kept at particular premises will be determined by— (a) aggregating the total number of firearms (other than paint-ball firearms) kept at the premises on a permanent basis by a person who resides at the premises as the person’s principal place of residence, or occupies the premises as the person’s principal place of business (as the case requires); and (b) if more than 1 person resides at the premises as the person’s principal place of residence, or occupies the premises as the person’s principal place of business (as the case requires)—by aggregating the total number of firearms (other than paint-ball firearms) kept at the premises on a permanent basis by each such person.

Firearms Regulations 2017—1.7.2017 Schedule 1—Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items 80 This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 [3.7.2017]

(3) When a firearm in the possession of a person is not in use, the person— (a) must keep the firearm in a building or, subject to this clause, in an outbuilding, at premises that constitute the person’s principal place of residence or, if the firearm is in the possession of the person for the purposes of the person’s business, the person’s principal place of business; and (b) must secure the firearm at the premises as follows: (i) if the total number of firearms kept at the premises is less than 20 firearms and none of those firearms is a category C, D or H firearm— (A) where the firearm is kept under the main roof of the person’s residence or place of business—subject to subclause (6), by locking the firearm in a level 1 safe; or (B) where the firearm is not kept under the main roof of the person’s residence or place of business, or the firearm is kept in an outbuilding—subject to subclause (6), by locking the firearm in a level 2 safe; or (C) subject to subclauses (6) and (7)—by locking the firearm in a prescribed safe located in a building or outbuilding on the premises; or (D) in some other manner approved by the Registrar; (ii) if the total number of firearms kept at the premises is less than 20 firearms and at least 1 of those firearms is a category C, D, or H firearm (whether or not such a category of firearm is in possession of the person)— (A) subject to subclause (6), by locking the firearm in a level 2 safe located in a building or outbuilding on the premises; or (B) subject to subclauses (6) and (7), by locking the firearm—
• in a level 1 safe located in a building or outbuilding on the premises; or
• in a prescribed safe, located in a building or outbuilding on the premises; or (C) in some other manner approved by the Registrar; (iii) subject to subparagraph (vi), if the total number of firearms kept at the premises is 20 or more, but less than 35, firearms and not more than 29 of those firearms are category H firearms (whether or not the person possesses a category H firearm)— (A) in accordance with the requirements of storage level 1; or (B) in some other manner approved by the Registrar; (iv) subject to subparagraph (vi), if the total number of firearms kept at the premises is 35 or more, but less than 50, firearms and not more than 29 of those firearms are category H firearms (whether or not the person possesses a category H firearm)—

1.7.2017—Firearms Regulations 2017 Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items—Schedule 1 [3.7.2017] This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 81

(A) in accordance with the requirements of storage level 2; or (B) in some other manner approved by the Registrar; (v) subject to subparagraph (vi), if the total number of firearms kept at the premises is 50 or more firearms— (A) in accordance with the requirements of storage level 3; or (B) in some other manner approved by the Registrar; (vi) if the total number of firearms kept at particular premises is made up of, or includes, 30 or more category H firearms (regardless of whether the person possesses a category H firearm, or whether firearms of another category or categories are kept at the premises)— (A) in accordance with the requirements of storage level 3; or (B) in some other manner approved by the Registrar.

(4) The categories of offences for contraventions of subclause (3) are as follows: (a) a contravention of subclause (3)(a) is a category B offence; (b) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(i) is a category C offence; (c) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(ii) is a category C offence; (d) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(iii) is a category B offence; (e) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(iv) is a category B offence; (f) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(v) is a category A offence; (g) a contravention of subclause (3)(b)(vi) is a category A offence.

(5) Subclause (3)(a) does not apply if the person has obtained the approval of the Registrar to keep the firearm at some other premises and the person complies with the conditions of the approval (if any) imposed by the Registrar.

(6) If a prescribed safe, level 1 safe or level 2 safe weighs less than 150 kilograms when empty, a person may only secure a firearm in the safe under this clause if the safe is bolted to a solid concrete, brick, metal or timber floor, wall or other permanent internal structure of the building or outbuilding (as the case may be) in which it is located, with at least 2 solid anchor bolts.

(7) A person may only secure firearms in a prescribed safe or a level 1 safe under subclause (3)(b)(i)(C) or (3)(b)(ii)(B) if— (a) — (i) the person was the owner of the safe, and the safe was used by the person to secure the person’s firearms, immediately before the commencement of this clause; and (ii) either— (A) a period of not more than 12 months has passed from the commencement of this clause; or

Firearms Regulations 2017—1.7.2017 Schedule 1—Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items 82 This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 [3.7.2017]

(B) notice is given in writing by the person to the Registrar not more than 12 months after the commencement of this clause that paragraph (a)(i) applies to the person (supported by such evidence as is required by the Registrar), and the Registrar has confirmed to the person in writing that the notice was received by the Registrar; or (b) — (i) the person resides at, or occupies, premises with another person who was the owner of the safe, and the safe was used by the owner to secure the owner’s firearms, immediately before the commencement of this clause; and (ii) either— (A) a period of not more than 12 months has passed from the commencement of this clause; or (B) the requirements of paragraph (a)(ii)(B) have been satisfied. Note— Clause 23 of this code of practice sets out further requirements in relation to the shared use of safes by persons who reside at or occupy the same premises.”

Here is the security requirements from Schedule 1, section 2:


“level 1 safe means a safe that complies with the following requirements: (a) the body and door of the safe must be made of structural grade mild steel that is of a thickness of not less than 2 millimetres; (b) the door of the safe must be— (i) recessed or flush fitted and sized to prevent leverage points; and (ii) fitted with— (A) a 3 point locking mechanism activated by an internal key or electronic lock, or a pin combination lock or pick resistant deadlock or biometric fingerprint scanner; or (B) an external lock—
• the body of which is not less than 40 millimetres wide and has a hardened steel shackle; and
• that is fitted with a cover so as to prevent the lock from being cut, removed, breached or otherwise tampered with; level 2 safe means a safe that complies with the following requirements: (a) the body and door of the safe must be made of structural grade mild steel that is of a thickness of not less than 3 millimetres; (b) the door of the safe must be— (i) recessed or flush fitted and sized to prevent leverage points; and (ii) fitted with— (A) a 3 point locking mechanism activated by an internal key or electronic lock, or a pin combination lock, pick resistant deadlock or biometric fingerprint scanner; or (B) an external lock—
• the body of which is not less than 40 millimetres wide and has a hardened steel shackle; and
• that is fitted with a cover so as to prevent the lock from being cut, removed, breached or otherwise tampered with;

1.7.2017—Firearms Regulations 2017 Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items—Schedule 1 [3.7.2017] This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 71

outbuilding means a building subordinate to the main building on premises (including a garage or shed)— (a) that is affixed to land (whether or not it is detached from the main building of the premises on which it is located); and (b) that is fully enclosed, strong and in a structurally sound condition; and (c) the door or point of entry of which is capable of being securely locked, (but does not include a fully enclosed garage that is under the main roof of a residence or place of business); prescribed safe means a safe (other than a level 1 safe or a level 2 safe) that has a body and door made of steel of a thickness of not less than 1.6 millimetres; storage level 1—a firearm is secured in accordance with the requirements of storage level 1 if— (a) it is locked in a level 2 safe located in a building or outbuilding on the premises in which it is kept; and (b) unless the safe weighs at least 150 kilograms when empty, the safe is bolted to a solid concrete, brick, metal or timber floor, wall or other permanent internal structure of the building or outbuilding in which it is located with at least 2 solid anchor bolts; and (c) the premises on which the safe is located are installed with either— (i) a cctv system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect and record any unauthorised entry to the premises, building, outbuilding or room in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm; or (ii) an intruder alarm system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect, to the maximum extent reasonably practicable, any unauthorised entry of the premises, building, outbuilding or room in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm, by means of either or both of the following:
(A) an externally visible alarm warning light and a loud audible alarm;
(B) a remote alarm monitored by a private security company approved by the Registrar;

storage level 2—a firearm is secured in accordance with the requirements of storage level 2 if— (a) it is locked in a level 2 safe located in a building or outbuilding on the premises in which it is kept; and (b) unless the safe weighs at least 150 kilograms when empty, the safe is bolted to a solid concrete, brick, metal or timber floor, wall or other permanent internal structure of the building or outbuilding in which it is located with at least 2 solid anchor bolts; and (c) the premises on which the safe is located are installed with both—

Firearms Regulations 2017—1.7.2017 Schedule 1—Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items 72 This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 [3.7.2017]

(i) a cctv system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect and record any unauthorised entry of the premises, building, outbuilding or room in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm; and (ii) an intruder alarm system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect, to the maximum extent reasonably practicable, any unauthorised entry of the premises, building, outbuilding or room in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm, by means of either or both of the following:

(A) an externally visible alarm warning light and a loud audible alarm;
(B) a remote alarm monitored by a private security company approved by the Registrar; storage level 3—a firearm is secured in accordance with the requirements of storage level 3 if— (a) it is locked in a strongroom located in a building or outbuilding; and (b) the premises on which the strongroom is located are installed with both— (i) a cctv system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect and record any unauthorised entry of the premises, building, outbuilding or strongroom in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm; and (ii) an intruder alarm system that is activated and operating at any time the premises are unoccupied in order to detect, to the maximum extent reasonably practicable, any unauthorised entry of the premises, building, outbuilding or strongroom in which a firearm is kept, or any unauthorised interference with a firearm, by means of either or both of the following:
(A) an externally visible alarm warning light and a loud audible alarm;
(B) a remote alarm monitored by a private security company approved by the Registrar;

strongroom means a strongroom that complies with the following requirements: (a) the strongroom must not have any windows or skylights; (b) the floor, ceilings and walls of the strongroom must be made of— (i) reinforced concrete; or (ii) double brick; or (iii) reinforced besser blocks, of a thickness of not less than 140 millimetres; (c) any door to the strongroom must be made of— (i) solid sheet structural grade mild steel of a thickness of not less than 10 millimetres; or

1.7.2017—Firearms Regulations 2017 Code of Practice for the Security, Storage and Transport of Firearms, Ammunition and Related Items—Schedule 1 [3.7.2017] This version is not published under the Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002 73

(ii) solid sheet cut resistant steel of a thickness of not less than 3 millimetres that— (A) has a chemical composition that includes at least 12% manganese; and (B) is encased within, or reinforced by, solid sheet timber of a thickness of not less than 40 millimetres; (d) any door to the strongroom must be fitted with— (i) internal hinges that are concealed or have the hinge pins welded; and (ii) — (A) a 3 point locking mechanism; or (B) 4 shoot bolts that are located on the inside of the strongroom at the top and bottom of the door, that is, or are, activated by an internal key or electric lock, or a pin combination lock, pick resistant deadlock or biometric fingerprint scanner; under the main roof, of a residence or place of business, means within the enclosed internal structures of the building constituting the residence or place of business. (2) For the purposes of this code of practice, a firearm will be taken to be loaded if a round is in the breech, barrel or chamber of the firearm or in a magazine comprising part of or attached to the firearm.”

      I hope that readers are still with me, because the above is just a small sample of what has been put in place. Farmers who have children who own firearms may find that the magic 20 number figure for a residence is quickly met. Indeed, hypothetically, a group of unrelated people renting a large house, each owning firearms, secured by say level 1 safes, may find that because of gun ownership by distinct people in the same residence, “residence” not being defined, it will be necessary to have more comprehensive security arrangements, including a level 2 safe, and CCTV and security alarms, connected to a security firm. This will be extremely costly. Even a good safe, say level 2, may be over $1,500 or more, depending on the quality. Delivery costs will be on top of that. To have monitoring by a security firm could run into many thousands of dollars, because an armed response would be needed, involving a number of armed  men. This will be highly dangerous work, and danger means big money.

    All of this is absurd, and has been done as part of a program to take guns away from lawful citizens. It does nothing to make the community safer because CCTV and security alarms, can be easily got over by any sophisticated crook. The crooks will be gone with the guns before the security guys get there, who probably will not be confronting firearms robbers anyway, playing it safe by waiting for the police, if they don’t have the numbers.  People in rural areas will not benefit from this at all, since there will be a time factor again for police and/or security getting to the robbery. And, in any case, these gun robberies are almost always after pistols, not .22 rabbit guns, which are useless for criminals. There is some justification for people owning pistols to have tighter security arrangements, and everyone does anyway, but to thereby apply this to all firearms betrays the real agenda behind this; to ban guns by making it too difficult for people to legally comply. It is all about costing people out of the sport

    A regime, who bans citizen ownership of firearms, usually does so in preparation for tyranny and genocide against its own people, and that is just down the track. Australia is fast marching into being a multicultural totalitarian state, where those who were once citizens just become subjects and slaves, as free men and women own guns, but slaves do not: http://www.foaa.com.au/weapons-amendment-bill-voted-on-by-lnp-labour-today/aafreemowen-guns-slaever-dont/.

 

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