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Could the Coronavirus be a Ploy to Bring in the Cashless Society? By James Reed

     I have been reading Brian Simpson’s take on the coronavirus issue, and disturbances produced by the crisis. What have the elites to benefit from it? Where is the conspiracy? Well, dirty bank notes, which are all bank notes supposedly can carry the bug:
  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/02/exclusive-dirty-banknotes-may-spreading-coronavirus-world-health/?utm_content=telegraph&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR2li9tCpeSrNq_F89BCc_iioGyaormfwZ8xhnar60BJWwQkg8C55laC_6o#Echobox=1583183632

“Banknotes may be spreading the new coronavirus so people should try to use contactless payments instead, the World Health Organization has said. Customers should wash their hands after touching banknotes because infectious Covid-19 may cling to the surface for a number of days, the UN agency said on Monday night. To prevent the spread of the disease, people should use contactless technology where possible, a spokesperson added. The Bank of England has acknowledged that banknotes "can carry bacteria or viruses" and urged people to wash their hands regularly.”

https://www.technocracy.news/coronavirus-who-urges-people-to-go-cashless/

“Following reports that Beijing had “quarantined” dirty cash, the WHO warned on Monday that the virus could survive on banknotes, potentially spreading Covid-19 within communities, and across the world. To reduce the risk of being infected by money, the NGO advised citizens in countries struggling with outbreaks to favor digital payments when possible, the Daily Telegraph reported. That the WHO is telling the public to avoid cash is hardly a surprise: research has found that coronaviruses have been found to live on surfaces for as long as 9 days. During the statement, a WHO spokesman referenced a Bank of England study claiming that banknotes “can carry bacteria or viruses” and urged people to wash their hands. Other studies have shown that 90% of US $1 bills had bacteria present, and one Swiss study found that viruses had survive on the faces of Swiss francs for days. The WHO’s warnings follow the People’s Bank of China last month started disinfecting currency deposited at Chinese banks using ultraviolet light, before quarantining the bills for a week before releasing them back into circulation. Brits, and their fellow Europeans, should be increasingly careful as the virus spreads across Europe, the WHO warned, via the Telegraph: “We know that money changes hands frequently and can pick up all sorts of bacteria and viruses,” a spokesman told the Telegraph. “We would advise people to wash their hands after handling banknotes, and avoid touching their face. When possible, it would also be advisable to use contactless payments to reduce the risk of transmission.” Of course, that one of the world’s major NGOs is seizing the opportunity to proclaim the virtues of ‘paperless’ money is hardly a surprise: the globalist push toward a ‘cashless society’ has been underway for years now, having had its biggest successes in Scandinavia. Sweden has gone virtually “cashless”, and in such a short time, they’ve already confronted the many drawbacks of relying exclusively on digital money.”

     So, bringing in cashless society could be one agenda behind the coronavirus controversy. There are other points to be made too:
  https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/how-pandemic-crisis-will-probably-develop-over-next-year

    What will happen though, whatever way this crisis pans out, is the  political class will not let the crisis go to waste, and will be using the pandemic to push through more ancho-tyrannical laws to control us:
  https://www.zerohedge.com/health/six-reasons-why-covid-19-fails-sniff-test

 

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Monday, 25 May 2020
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