Big Pharma Ripped of the “World’s Poor”! By James Reed

If you want a case against Big pHarma, consistent with woke left values, consider the report from none other than The New York Times, that Big Pharma is refusing to refund $ 1.4 billion that was made in advanced payments for Covid goo, now cancelled. The web is tangled, but does not look good for the morality of Big Pharma. The article appeals to the conscience of vaccine makers:

“Covid vaccine manufacturers “have a special responsibility” because their products are a societal good and most were developed with public funding, said Thomas Frieden, the chief executive of the global health nonprofit Resolve to Save Lives and a former director of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

The problem here, as recent Project Veritas revelations have shown, is the Big Pharma is a wee bit lacking in that, as are most of the big Covid players today.

 

https://archive.is/L9ppQ  

“As global demand for Covid-19 vaccines dries up, the program responsible for vaccinating the world’s poor has been urgently negotiating to try to get out of its deals with pharmaceutical companies for shots it no longer needs.

Drug companies have so far declined to refund $1.4 billion in advance payments for now-canceled doses, according to confidential documents obtained by The New York Times.

Gavi, the international immunization organization that bought the shots on behalf of the global Covid vaccination program, Covax, has said little publicly about the costs of canceling the orders. But Gavi financial documents show the organization has been trying to stanch the financial damage. If it cannot strike a more favorable agreement with another company, Johnson & Johnson, it could have to pay still more.

Gavi is a Geneva-based nongovernmental organization that uses funds from donors including the U.S. government and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to provide childhood immunizations to lower-income nations. Early in the pandemic, it was charged with buying Covid vaccinations for the developing world — armed with one of the largest-ever mobilizations of humanitarian funding — and began negotiations with the vaccine makers.

Those negotiations went badly at the outset. The companies initially shut the organization out of the market, prioritizing high-income countries that were able to pay more to lock up the first doses. Gavi eventually reached deals with nine manufacturers.

But the shots did not begin to reach developing countries in significant numbers until mid-2022. By the time Gavi had a steady flow of supply, demand had begun to decline: countries with frail health systems struggled to deliver the shots, and the dominance of the milder Omicron variant sapped people’s motivation to be vaccinated. Now, Covax is winding down far short of its goal of vaccinating 70 percent of the population of each country.

The vaccine makers have brought in more than $13 billion from the shots that have been distributed through Covax. Under the contracts, the companies are not obligated to return the prepayments Gavi gave them to reserve vaccines that were ultimately canceled.

But in light of how many vaccine doses Gavi has had to cancel, some public health experts criticized the companies’ actions.

Covid vaccine manufacturers “have a special responsibility” because their products are a societal good and most were developed with public funding, said Thomas Frieden, the chief executive of the global health nonprofit Resolve to Save Lives and a former director of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“That’s a lot of money that could do a lot of good,” he said.

He added that other large global health programs have budgets roughly equal to the amount the vaccine makers are holding on to. “The entire polio eradication effort costs about $1 billion a year, and that’s a huge infrastructure,” he said.”

 

 

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Monday, 22 April 2024

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