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The End of “working Hard” By James Reed

     What is the point of working hard? Well, in my opinion, with the West in free fall, with everything open to existential loss for all time, probably not much point at all, for conventional work. All that is really worth doing now is making one last political stand against the criminally insane elites, facing the prospects of the dark night of oblivion:
  https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/hack/2020-edelman-trust-barometer-shows-growing-sense-of-inequality/11883788

“A growing sense of inequality is undermining trust in both society's institutions and capitalism, according to a long-running global survey. The 2020 Edelman Trust Barometer - now in its 20th year - has found many people no longer believe working hard will give them a better life. Despite strong economic performance, a majority of respondents in every developed market do not believe they will be better off in five years' time. This means that economic growth no longer appears to drive trust, at least in developed markets - upending the conventional wisdom. "We are living in a trust paradox," said Richard Edelman, CEO of Edelman. "Since we began measuring trust 20 years ago, economic growth has fostered rising trust. This continues in Asia and the Middle East but not in developed markets, where national income inequality is now the more important factor. Fears are stifling hope, and long-held assumptions about hard work leading to upward mobility are now invalid.

Growing 'trust chasm' between elites and the public
Fifty-six per cent of the surveyed global population said capitalism in its current form does more harm than good in the world. Most employees (83 percent) globally are worried about job loss due to automation, a looming recession, lack of training, cheaper foreign competition, immigration and the gig economy. Fifty-seven percent of respondents worry about losing the respect and dignity they once enjoyed in their country. Nearly two in three feel the pace of technological change is too fast. Australia recorded one of the largest declines of trust in technology. Australians were most worried about losing their job to the gig economy, followed by recession, lack of training, and foreign competitors. The study also found a growing "trust chasm" between elites and the public that could be a reflection of income inequality, Edelman said.

     This abyss between the elites and the rest of us mob will continue to grow. It happened in Ancient Rome, and it is all going through the same disintegration cycle again:
  https://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2020/02/01/the-new-dark-ages-in-western-europe-and-north-america-comparisons-with-the-fall-of-rome/

 

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Monday, 25 May 2020
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